Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica

Rome, Italy

The Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica (GNAA), or National Gallery of Ancient Art, is the main national collection of older (broadly, pre-1800) paintings in Rome. It has two sites: the Palazzo Barberini and the Palazzo Corsini.

The Palazzo Barberini was designed for Pope Urban VIII, a member of the Barberini family, by 16th century Italian architect Carlo Maderno on the old location of Villa Sforza. Its central salon ceiling was decorated by Pietro da Cortona with the visual panegyric of the Allegory of Divine Providence and Barberini Power to glorify the papal Barberini family.

The Palazzo Corsini, formerly known as Palazzo Riario, is a 15th-century palace that was rebuilt in the 18th century by architect Ferdinando Fuga for Cardinal Neri Maria Corsini. For a partial list of artworks, see Palazzo Corsini entry.

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Details

Founded: 1893
Category: Museums in Italy

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tony Popa (7 months ago)
The Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica (GNAA), or National Gallery of Ancient Art, is an art gallery in Rome, Italy, the main national collection of older (broadly, pre-1800) paintings in Rome. It has two sites: the Palazzo Barberini and the Palazzo Corsini. The Palazzo Barberini was designed for Pope Urban VIII, a member of the Barberini family, by 16th century Italian architect Carlo Maderno on the old location of Villa Sforza. Its central salon ceiling was decorated by Pietro da Cortona with the visual panegyric of the Allegory of Divine Providence and Barberini Power to glorify the papal Barberini family. The Palazzo Corsini, formerly known as Palazzo Riario, is a 15th-century palace that was rebuilt in the 18th century by architect Ferdinando Fuga for Cardinal Neri Maria Corsini. For a partial list of artworks, see Palazzo Corsini entry.
Christina Singer (7 months ago)
Had a good laugh in this place, I will never forget it. Beautiful art.
STEVE QUAYLE (9 months ago)
An oasis of calm and inspiration in a hectic area. Lovely gallery with some impressive moments. Especially good as it is not so busy with tourists from nearby Trevi. Free admission on first Sunday of each month
Luisa Luze (10 months ago)
Very rude staff. Most were ok. Some were really not. It’s not the tourist fault they had to wake up early and work on a Sunday. But they sure behave as though you’re a sinner for being there. The collection is good but the ticket is expensive for what they have there. They have more works by Caravaggio’s students then Caravaggio himself. The building itself is interesting, and the frescoes are the best part. If you don’t have a lot of time in Rome choose some other more interesting place to go. This place will take time and money and not reward you well. One third of the rooms were closed.
Ishel Hertz (11 months ago)
Such a beautiful place. The gates were open but the ticket office was closed so I walked through the open areas with other tourists. I didn't see inside but the outside area was so beautiful. The sculptures are amazing to see up close.
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