Galleria Spada

Rome, Italy

The Galleria Spada is a museum in Rome, which is housed in the Palazzo Spada of the same name. The palazzo is also famous for its façade and for the forced perspective gallery by Francesco Borromini. The gallery exhibits paintings from the 16th and 17th century.

he Galleria was opened in 1927 in the Palazzo Spada. It closed during the 1940s, but reopened in 1951 thanks to the efforts of the Conservator of the Galleries of Rome, Anchille Bertini Calosso and the Director, Frederico Zeri. Zeri was committed to locating the remaining artwork that had been scattered during the war, as he intended to recreate the original layout of the 16th-17th version of the gallery, including the placement of the pictures, the furniture and the sculptures. Most of the exhibited artwork comes predominantly from the private collection of Bernardino Spada, supplemented by smaller collections such as that of Virgilio Spada.

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Details

Founded: 1927
Category: Museums in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Francesco Campanella (12 months ago)
Not to be considered as a museum. 4 rooms full of paintings and some marbles, but I don't recommend a visit.
Tony Popa (2 years ago)
The Galleria Spada is a museum in Rome (Italy), which is housed in the Palazzo Spada of the same name, located in the Piazza Capo di Ferro. The palazzo is also famous for its façade and for the forced perspective gallery by Francesco Borromini. The gallery exhibits paintings from the 16th and 17th century.
Pim van der Horst (2 years ago)
Pure baroque palace filled with great art. Very friendly staff
Susanna Pacini (2 years ago)
We loved the experience of being there it was being thrown back in time without actually living our time....Baroque paintings from Caravaggio..
Leigh (2 years ago)
We enjoyed strolling around this small, quiet gallery. There are only four rooms, originally a house, but the house itself is interesting and there are loads of paintings, sculptures and ornate furniture to see. There are printed guides in several languages available in the first room, to explain a bit about each artwork. Lastly, in the garden, there’s Borromini’s Perspective, a Baroque perspective illusion. We also encountered a glorious fat cat sunning himself in a bed of clover, who was only too happy for some fussing. The artworks were great but the fat cat was the best part.
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