Galleria Spada

Rome, Italy

The Galleria Spada is a museum in Rome, which is housed in the Palazzo Spada of the same name. The palazzo is also famous for its façade and for the forced perspective gallery by Francesco Borromini. The gallery exhibits paintings from the 16th and 17th century.

he Galleria was opened in 1927 in the Palazzo Spada. It closed during the 1940s, but reopened in 1951 thanks to the efforts of the Conservator of the Galleries of Rome, Anchille Bertini Calosso and the Director, Frederico Zeri. Zeri was committed to locating the remaining artwork that had been scattered during the war, as he intended to recreate the original layout of the 16th-17th version of the gallery, including the placement of the pictures, the furniture and the sculptures. Most of the exhibited artwork comes predominantly from the private collection of Bernardino Spada, supplemented by smaller collections such as that of Virgilio Spada.

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Founded: 1927
Category: Museums in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Call Me M. (8 months ago)
Nice place to go, it wasnt crowded at all but your experience may differ! If you like forced perspectives, this is for you! and you hardly pay anything (up to 25)
Alex Unguru (14 months ago)
Probably one of the most immersive Art Galleries in Rome. The smell of orange blossoms from the inner courtyard accompanies you in every room. Better take a day, enjoy it in peace and then taste Rome from one of the nearby terraces.
Avery Haviv (16 months ago)
Lovely formally private art collection. Very intimate and quiet experience.
Micaela Almeida (16 months ago)
Loved the Borromini’s Perspective piece in the garden! And the gallery rooms are also stunning. Could not believe that There was only 3 people there. Really worth a visit!
Francesco Campanella (17 months ago)
Not to be considered as a museum. 4 rooms full of paintings and some marbles, but I don't recommend a visit.
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