Stora Sundby Castle

Stora Sundby, Sweden

Stora Sundby castle was mentioned first time in Middle Ages. In 1364 it was besieged and captured by Albrecht during his battle with Magnus Eriksson. From the end of 1300s to the early 1400s it belonged to Lars Ulfsson Blå. After him Stora Sundby was owned by Julita monastery and families of Natt och Dag, Sparre and Chevron.

The present main house was built by Lars Siggesson Sparre, who asked Carl de Geer to design a new castle on the old Norman style. The casle was finished in 1848. The drawings were made ​​up by the English architect J.F. Robinson. In refurbishment underwent castle a fundamental change in the exterior but the interior remained mainly unchanged. The architecture symbolizes a year calendar: 52 rooms (number of weeks per year), 12 small towers (12 months per year), four large towers (four seasons), 365 windows (days per year).

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Address

56, Stora Sundby, Sweden
See all sites in Stora Sundby

Details

Founded: 1848
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

george saguna (11 months ago)
We only walked around the grounds of the castle, but it was impressive nonetheless. The castle itself looks like it belongs in a fairy tale and the grounds are very well kept and not overly manicured. They still feel like you’re out in the countryside and not just walking through someone’s garden, not to mention the beautiful lake it overlooks. Next time, we hope to catch a glimpse of the interior of this magnificent castle.
Iñigo Ruiz-Apilánez (11 months ago)
Quite unique place to visit!!!
Yair Weil (13 months ago)
Beautiful Swedish castle. Too bad we couldn't go inside.
Fredrik Granlund (14 months ago)
Amazing castle, inspired by Ivanhoe.
Janne Lindfors (16 months ago)
Absolutely amazing place. Cheap entrance 20kr/adult. A lot to see. Would be nice to visit inside castle someday!
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