Stora Sundby Castle

Stora Sundby, Sweden

Stora Sundby castle was mentioned first time in Middle Ages. In 1364 it was besieged and captured by Albrecht during his battle with Magnus Eriksson. From the end of 1300s to the early 1400s it belonged to Lars Ulfsson Blå. After him Stora Sundby was owned by Julita monastery and families of Natt och Dag, Sparre and Chevron.

The present main house was built by Lars Siggesson Sparre, who asked Carl de Geer to design a new castle on the old Norman style. The casle was finished in 1848. The drawings were made ​​up by the English architect J.F. Robinson. In refurbishment underwent castle a fundamental change in the exterior but the interior remained mainly unchanged. The architecture symbolizes a year calendar: 52 rooms (number of weeks per year), 12 small towers (12 months per year), four large towers (four seasons), 365 windows (days per year).

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

56, Stora Sundby, Sweden
See all sites in Stora Sundby

Details

Founded: 1848
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

george saguna (5 months ago)
We only walked around the grounds of the castle, but it was impressive nonetheless. The castle itself looks like it belongs in a fairy tale and the grounds are very well kept and not overly manicured. They still feel like you’re out in the countryside and not just walking through someone’s garden, not to mention the beautiful lake it overlooks. Next time, we hope to catch a glimpse of the interior of this magnificent castle.
Iñigo Ruiz-Apilánez (5 months ago)
Quite unique place to visit!!!
Yair Weil (7 months ago)
Beautiful Swedish castle. Too bad we couldn't go inside.
Fredrik Granlund (8 months ago)
Amazing castle, inspired by Ivanhoe.
Janne Lindfors (10 months ago)
Absolutely amazing place. Cheap entrance 20kr/adult. A lot to see. Would be nice to visit inside castle someday!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Lübeck Cathedral

Lübeck Cathedral is a large brick-built Lutheran cathedral in Lübeck, Germany and part of the Lübeck UNESCO World Heritage Site. In 1173 Henry the Lion founded the cathedral to serve the Diocese of Lübeck, after the transfer in 1160 of the bishop's seat from Oldenburg in Holstein under bishop Gerold. The then Romanesque cathedral was completed around 1230, but between 1266 and 1335 it was converted into a Gothic-style building with side-aisles raised to the same height as the main aisle.

On the night of Palm Sunday (28–29 March) 1942 a Royal Air Force bombing raid destroyed a fifth of the town centre. Several bombs fell in the area around the church, causing the eastern vault of the quire to collapse and destroying the altar which dated from 1696. A fire from the neighbouring cathedral museum spread to the truss of the cathedral, and around noon on Palm Sunday the towers collapsed. An Arp Schnitger organ was lost in the flames. Nevertheless, a relatively large portion of the internal fittings was saved, including the cross and almost all of the medieval polyptychs. In 1946 a further collapse, of the gable of the north transept, destroyed the vestibule almost completely.

Reconstruction of the cathedral took several decades, as greater priority was given to the rebuilding of the Marienkirche. Work was completed only in 1982.

The cathedral is unique in that at 105 m, it is shorter than the tallest church in the city. This is the consequence of a power struggle between the church and the guilds.

The 17 m crucifix is the work of the Lübeck artist Bernt Notke. It was commissioned by the bishop of Lübeck, Albert II. Krummendiek, and erected in 1477. The carvings which decorate the rood screen are also by Notke.

Since the war, the famous altar of Hans Memling has been in the medieval collection of the St. Annen Museum, but notable polyptychs remain in the cathedral.

In the funeral chapels of the southern aisle are Baroque-era memorials by the Flemish sculptor Thomas Quellinus.