San Siro di Struppa

Genoa, Italy

San Siro di Struppa is a Romanesque-style church in Struppa, a neighborhood of Genoa. Benedictine abbey was founded here in the Middle Ages, entitled to St. Syrus of Genoa, who, according to the tradition, was born here. A church existed here, most likely, since the 5th century AD, but it is documented only in 955. In 1025 bishop Landulf I of Genoa gave it the Benedictines.

The church was most likely rebuilt in the 12th century, as testified by its Genoese Romanesque style. It received a series of modifications in the 16th century, in the wake of the new procedures established by the Council of Trent. Baroque elements were added in the 17th century. The Romanesque forms were restored in the 20th century.

The church was built in sandstone, without external decorative elements aside from the Lombard bands of the upper edges of the walls, present on every side. The central rose window of the façade was restored in the 20th century, replacing the Baroque window. In that occasion were also restored the triple mullioned windows of the bell tower, which has a height of 32 m.

The interior has a nave and two aisles, divided by sturdy columns without decorations. The main piece of art is a polyptych of St. Syrus (1516), once attributed to Teramo Piaggio, now assigned to Pier Francesco Sacchi.

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Address

Via di Creto 64, Genoa, Italy
See all sites in Genoa

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gi Zeta (8 months ago)
Luogo di prestigoso interesse storico artistico e culturale in prossimità dell' acquedotto storico di Genova Valbisagno
Emilio Viviani (9 months ago)
It is certainly one of the most beautiful churches in Genoa. In Romanesque style, the church is certainly an artistic and cultural work of considerable value, whose origins officially date back to the year 1000. It has undergone several changes over the years but the renovations of the last century have brought the structure back to its original state. as far as possible. The churchyard has a wonderful black and white checkerboard flooring made of pebbles .... called risseu.
salvatore agosta (13 months ago)
A place of wonder ... you leave the city and you are in Heaven!
Dalila De Vidi (13 months ago)
Very nice place The only problem is the parking
Rebelalol (14 months ago)
Very old and well maintained. The route includes a visit to the church and lunch at Piro's.
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