Porta Soprana

Genoa, Italy

Porta Soprana is the best-known gate of the ancient walls of Genoa. After major restorations carried out between the 19th and 20th centuries, it has regained the appearance it supposedly had at the time of the construction of the so-called Barbarossa walls (1150 ca.).

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Details

Founded: c. 1150
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vincent Malafronte (10 months ago)
Historical sight. In good shape.
Sid Mepstead (12 months ago)
Lived next door for a week very cool eateries nearby
Rob Raad (12 months ago)
A marvelous pice of history
Nidhi (13 months ago)
Porta Soprana was the entrance to the city for anyone who came to Genoa from the east. It dominated the hill of S. Andrea, which takes its name from the monastery demolished in the nineteenth century to create Via Dante and the building that currently houses the Bank of Italy. The tall towers that frame the access to the Porta Soprana still bear the two gravestones in Latin that commemorate the architectural enterprise.Genoese build these walls in 1155 because they feared the attack by Barbarossa. The Porta Soprana was the main entrance on the east side. Right next to it there was the house of Christopher Columbus. Near by many restaurants there.
Tuan Anh Tran (16 months ago)
Historical figure ensembles as tall gate with two towers as a remaining part of the accient building. The Porta Soprana is the symbol of the city and the icon of a long lasting history. The condition of the gate is keeping well with no sign of harm from human beings. You can recognize the gate at a far distance immediately with it height and unique structure. The gate brings the memories and impressions of a long gone past simply breathtaking that has been standing for centuries to represent the Mediterranean (for nearly 1000 years and still being well). Even it is a building but it brings the natural feelings by its strange blended with nature. Located in the Center of town, it will catch your eyes immediately when you see it. Up from the gate you can enjoy the whole view of the little and lovely city Genoa. Definitely a must visit place on your trip to Genoa and being one of the most beautiful places of the journey. Around the gate, there are plenty more of other tourist attractions such as Colombo house, casa di Cristoforo that you can reach easily as well as many shop for souvenirs and restaurants for enjoying the local cusines.
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