Dragonara Castle

Camogli, Italy

According to some historical sources, Dragonara Castle was built in the first half of the 13th century. In the second half of the 14th century, the castle, to ensure the safety of the fishing village of Camogli, was repeatedly reinforced, receiving the necessary weapons from the Republic of Genoa.

In the 14th century, the Dragonara Castle was attacked several times. Well documented are the assaults made by Gian Galeazzo Visconti, Lord of Milan, and the one made by Nicolò Fieschi in 1366.

Between 1428 and 1430, the castle was considerably enlarged and reinforced, especially the adjacent watchtower. In 1438, the Duchy of Milan besieged the castle, destroying its walls. A few years later, the inhabitants of the seaside village built new walls around the castle.

In 1448, due to a conflict between Camogli, Recco and Genoa, the Republic demanded the immediate destruction of the castle. The castle was destroyed, but it was rebuilt again only six years later and given to the Doge of Genoa.

In the 16th century, the castle was abandoned as a defensive post, and it was used as a prison.

In the seventies of the 20th century, after decades of neglect, the building was recovered and converted into an aquarium, hosting specimens of the marine fauna typical of these waters. At the closing of the aquarium, the fish were transferred to the Genoa aquarium.

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Address

Via Isola 26, Camogli, Italy
See all sites in Camogli

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.italyscapes.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anne Marie Berge (14 months ago)
A 13th century castle in Camogli, Liguria, Italia. Castel Dragone is another name of the castle.
Dan Gray (2 years ago)
Cool spot with great views.
Antoine M (2 years ago)
It was closed to the public being Saturday, but it's a monument that dominates this gorgeous sanctuary.
John Ruffino (2 years ago)
Beautiful views of the sea and town.
Alexey (3 years ago)
Very beautiful sea. I read feedbacks before visit, but i eas surprised in any case. Small, very attractive with own atmosphere. Difficult to park a car, but very good for walks. Bonus: a lot (really a lot) of beautiful girls on the beach.
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