Doge's Palace

Genoa, Italy

The Doge's Palace was once the home of the Doges of Genoa. It is now a museum and a centre for cultural events and arts exhibitions. It is situated in the heart of the city, with two different entrances and façades, the main one on Piazza Matteotti, and the second one on Piazza De Ferrari.

The first parts of the Palace were built between 1251 and 1275, during the flourishing period of the Republican history of Genoa, while the Torre Grimaldina (also named 'Torre del Popolo') was completed in 1539.

The palace originated from the acquisition by the commune of Genoa of houses of the Doria between San Matteo and San Lorenzo churches (1291), after which the construction of an annexed new building was started. To this, in 1294, a tower of the Fieschi family was added. The palace was restored in the 1590s by Andrea Ceresola. Around 1655, the Ducal Chapel was frescoed by Giovanni Battista Carlone and Domenico Fiasella. In 1777, it was subject to a fire, and was subsequently rebuilt in Neoclassicist style by Simone Cantoni.

On the main floor, the so-called Piano Nobile, are the frescoed halls of the Maggior and Minor Consiglio, where many public events take place.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Adrian (8 months ago)
Great exhibitions. A regular stop when I come to Genova
Roger Seganti (8 months ago)
Very nice building, in the center of Genova. Nice the Banksy show.
Enrico Knoll (9 months ago)
Banksy exhibition at Doge's palace. Very nice! Worth the ticket!
Mihály Kun (16 months ago)
One of the greatest mediavel palaces I've ever seen. It is a multifunctional meeting place full of life.
Elodie Careme (19 months ago)
The place is amazing! It is worth visiting just for the architecture. But I was lucky enough to lose myself in an exhibit dedicated to Mexican painters and to hear a free concert of philarmonic band on a beautiful Summer Sunday. Must-see in the city!
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