Genoa Cathedral

Genoa, Italy

Genoa Cathedral is dedicated to Saint Lawrence (San Lorenzo), and is the seat of the Archbishop of Genoa. The cathedral was consecrated by Pope Gelasius II in 1118 and was built between the twelfth century and the fourteenth century as fundamentally a medieval building, with some later additions.

Various altars and chapels have been erected between the 14th and 15th centuries. The small loggia on the north-eastern tower of the façade was built in 1455; the opposite one, in Mannerist style, is from 1522. In 1550 the Perugian architect Galeazzo Alessi was commissioned by the city magistrates to plan the reconstruction of the entire building; however, he executed only the covering of the nave and aisles, the pavement, the dome and the apse.

The construction of the cathedral finished in the 17th century. The dome and the medieval parts were restored in 1894-1900.

The Museum of the Treasury lies under the cathedral and holds a collection of jewellery and silverware from 9 AD up to the present. Among the most important pieces are the sacred bowl brought by Guglielmo Embriaco after the conquest of Caesarea and supposed to be the chalice used by Christ during the Last Supper.

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Details

Founded: 1118
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eleonora Panciroli (3 months ago)
The Genova CBD is simply stunning, plenty of hidden places were you can loose yourself and breathe the real culture. The cattedrale of San Lorenzo best represents the city’s heart
natasha day (4 months ago)
Its stunning and my favorite cathedral in Genova. Its beautiful inside but the beat thing is to sit outside and watch the animation of the people bustling around.
James Lajeunesse (7 months ago)
One is immediately greeted by the huge Lion sculptures that watch and guard both sides of the main entrance. I looked with awe at the amazing stone carving that is layered around the door portals. The talent and creativity of the artisans that produced this work of art is impressive. Once inside, the huge vaulted ceilings, gold gilted moldings, paintings, and sculptures make a very memorable impression on every visitor. I also took notice of the large and beautiful rosette window high above the front door. I'm glad I had a chance to discover this cathedral during my visit.
Zach Polmanteer (7 months ago)
A very nice place to visit when in Genoa. Note there is a strict dress code, no short pants and shoulders may not be exposed. But if you follow the dress code is is worth a visit.
Polina Dylenok (8 months ago)
Really impressive architecture masterpiece. One of the most beautiful churches in Italy. It's not far from the train station, so it is for sure worth a quick visit. Beautiful stone mosaic outside. Definitely worth seeing. The tower tour thought is a joke. You will have an opportunity to see the inside of the church but you not gonna get to the top of the tower and there is no view outside.
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