Sarzanello Fortress

Sarzana, Italy

In 963 A.D., Emperor Otto I granted to Adalberto Bishop of Luni ownership of the castrum Sarzanae, a fortified village where today the fortress of Sarzanello is located. It was developed around a village of which only a few houses remain near the fort, while the remaining part was destroyed during the Austrian war of succession.

In 1494, when the castle was given to Charles VIII, it had already started taking on its current shape, with a 60 m-side large triangle with circular corner towers. The main tower and the crowning of the wall curtains were still missing. The current appearance dates mainly from 1502 when the construction was completed.

Today from the fortress of Sarzanello you can enjoy a full and beautiful view of Sarzana.

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Details

Founded: 1494
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.liguriaheritage.it

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

IMtrigirl (2 years ago)
One of my favorite places in Sarzana to take photos.
Kirill Lykov (2 years ago)
I simply like fortresses and this one is in good condition. Audio guide exists but was not functioning at the day of my visit
ion drumea (2 years ago)
If you want to go back in time and live a moment of italiana ancient life this is the right place. It is a fortess about the end of 1400, with prison, dark dungeon and rooms redecorate with real period furniture. And if it is not enough there is a splendid 360 degree view of neighboring city countries.
Elisa R. (2 years ago)
Very interesting fortress in great conditions. I advice you to buy an audioguide , so to have many information about it.
Paul Cicatello (3 years ago)
Great hike up there, beautiful
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Varberg Fortress was built in 1287-1300 by count Jacob Nielsen as protection against his Danish king, who had declared him an outlaw after the murder of King Eric V of Denmark. Jacob had close connections with king Eric II of Norway and as a result got substantial Norwegian assistance with the construction. The fortress, as well as half the county, became Norwegian in 1305.

King Eric's grand daughter, Ingeborg Håkansdotter, inherited the area from her father, King Haakon V of Norway. She and her husband, Eric, Duke of Södermanland, established a semi-independent state out of their Norwegian, Swedish and Danish counties until the death of Erik. They spent considerable time at the fortress. Their son, King Magnus IV of Sweden (Magnus VII of Norway), spent much time at the fortress as well.

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