Sarzanello Fortress

Sarzana, Italy

In 963 A.D., Emperor Otto I granted to Adalberto Bishop of Luni ownership of the castrum Sarzanae, a fortified village where today the fortress of Sarzanello is located. It was developed around a village of which only a few houses remain near the fort, while the remaining part was destroyed during the Austrian war of succession.

In 1494, when the castle was given to Charles VIII, it had already started taking on its current shape, with a 60 m-side large triangle with circular corner towers. The main tower and the crowning of the wall curtains were still missing. The current appearance dates mainly from 1502 when the construction was completed.

Today from the fortress of Sarzanello you can enjoy a full and beautiful view of Sarzana.

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Details

Founded: 1494
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.liguriaheritage.it

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paul Cicatello (9 months ago)
Great hike up there, beautiful
Igor Netto (2 years ago)
This a beautiful example of defensive engineering, and evolution of military fortification from 1200s to 1800s. Beware, this is not a caste but a military fortress, do not expect any fancy interiors. As usual the scarce explanations are given only in Italian. One can dine there with view over all the town of Sarzana and the Magra valley.
Robert Alberts (3 years ago)
Nice medieval castle that is maintained but largely left in its original state. Go there when in the neighbourhood. Mind the awkward opening times.
Renier Cilliers (3 years ago)
I updated the trading hours. Accurate info van spare you a trip from arriving at closed doors.
Massimo Conti (3 years ago)
Spectacular Medieval Fortness with a stunning 360 degrees view
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