Riomaggiore is the most southern village of the five Cinque Terre, all connected by trail. The water and mountainside have been declared national parks.

The village, dating from the early thirteenth century, is known for its historic character and its wine, produced by the town's vineyards. Riomaggiore is in the Riviera di Levante region and has a shoreline on the Mediterranean's Gulf of Genoa, with a small beach and a wharf framed by tower houses. Riomaggiore's main street is Via Colombo, where numerous restaurants, bars, and shops can be found.

The Via dell'Amore is a path connecting Riomaggiore to its frazione Manarola, also part of the Cinque Terre.

Riomaggiore inspired paintings by Telemaco Signorini (1835–1901), one of the artists of the Macchiaioli group.

The main religious sights are the church of San Giovanni Battista (built in 1340 in gothic style), and  the church of San Lorenzo (1338) with its beautiful rose window dating back to the 14th century. From the castle (built in 1260) you can enjoy a wonderful sight over the sea.

About 350 metres from the sea, along the coast road connecting the Cinque Terre with La Spezia, you can find the Sanctuary of Madonna di Montenero; enjoy the breathtaking panoramic view of the whole coastal line of the Cinque Terre.

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