Riomaggiore Castle

Riomaggiore, Italy

The Castle of Riomaggiore was built in the 13th century by order of Marquis Turcotti, lord of Ripalta, and it is one of the most important historical edifices in Cinque Terre. Indeed, the construction works were initiated by the marquis in 1260, but they were completed by the Genovese, after a period during which the property passed to Nicolo Fieschi. Back then, the Republic of Genoa was interested in strengthening the defensive system of Riomaggiore, and the castle was part of this project.

The square-based castle overlooks the sea, and, at its turn, it is overtopped by two circular towers which flank the entrance. In time, the castle underwent significant structural alterations, not to mention it was also used as a cemetery (in the early 19th century). The Oratory of Saint Rocco is located in the vicinity of the castle. At present, the edifice is used to cultural purposes, being home to sundry events. It can be reached by climbing the abrupt road which leads from the train station to the castle. It is also accessible from the courtyard of the Church of Saint John the Baptist of Riomaggiore. The castle is also locally known as Castellazzo of Cerrico.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.cinque-terre-tourism.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Carl Liversage (10 months ago)
One of the many places to spend a few hours when in the Cinque Terre
David Schmitt (11 months ago)
Beautiful area!! This is a very nice place to view the ocean and the two is a lot of fun to explore.
Richard Wallace (11 months ago)
Quaint. Cool streets... and lots of ice cream. Sooooo much ice cream
Leonardo Santana (13 months ago)
Very nice place to view the sunset from the top of Riomaggiore. It really worth the light hiking to get there.
Mustafa Abdel-khalik (13 months ago)
The view is amazing but they put a metal fence before the wall that over looks the sea and the coloured houses. So that people can't set on that wall.... that prevented taking photos with that great view
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