Riomaggiore Castle

Riomaggiore, Italy

The Castle of Riomaggiore was built in the 13th century by order of Marquis Turcotti, lord of Ripalta, and it is one of the most important historical edifices in Cinque Terre. Indeed, the construction works were initiated by the marquis in 1260, but they were completed by the Genovese, after a period during which the property passed to Nicolo Fieschi. Back then, the Republic of Genoa was interested in strengthening the defensive system of Riomaggiore, and the castle was part of this project.

The square-based castle overlooks the sea, and, at its turn, it is overtopped by two circular towers which flank the entrance. In time, the castle underwent significant structural alterations, not to mention it was also used as a cemetery (in the early 19th century). The Oratory of Saint Rocco is located in the vicinity of the castle. At present, the edifice is used to cultural purposes, being home to sundry events. It can be reached by climbing the abrupt road which leads from the train station to the castle. It is also accessible from the courtyard of the Church of Saint John the Baptist of Riomaggiore. The castle is also locally known as Castellazzo of Cerrico.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.cinque-terre-tourism.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Carolina Soto S. (9 months ago)
Interesting and beautiful to visit.
Katherine Brown (10 months ago)
This is a charming old quaint village. We arrived by scheduled boat from Portovenere. Great place to explore the shops and restaurants. Plenty of photo opportunities ~ just like the postcards.
Rodger Marshall (12 months ago)
Carved into the stone lies this little village. If you're staying in La Spezia, I suggest you take the train, because it's a lot cheaper and faster than boat tours, more frequent and less crowded. Driving is of course out of the question. There are cliffs on the right side of the bay, where you can dive. Otherwise, you can take a swim on the left side. The village has basically the main street with shops, bars and restaurants. In the summer season expect lots of tourists.
Carl Liversage (2 years ago)
One of the many places to spend a few hours when in the Cinque Terre
David Schmitt (2 years ago)
Beautiful area!! This is a very nice place to view the ocean and the two is a lot of fun to explore.
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