Levanto Castle

Levanto, Italy

The Castle of Levanto used to be part of the former defensive system of Levanto, the city walls, dating back to the 12th century, when the region was under the rule of the Malaspina family. The castle and the walls have been repeatedly mentioned in sundry historical documents, such that what is certain is the caste was extensively renovated during the 16th century. During the 17th century, the edifice was used as headquarters of the Captaincy of Levanto, but it was also used as prison under the rule of the Genovese.

Architecturally speaking, the castle consists of a square-based structure and an imposing circular tower. There are all sorts of decorative motifs which embellish the complex, of which the most notable are the ones reminiscent of the historical conflict between the Guelphs and the Ghibellines, as well as two bas-reliefs: one depicting the Annunciation and the other rendering Saint George defeating the Dragon.

Despite the fact the castle is at present a private property, it is a notable tourist sight in Levanto no visitor of Cinque Terre should miss out.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.cinque-terre-tourism.com

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Simone Bova (2 years ago)
Old and impressive
Simone Bova (2 years ago)
Old and impressive
Denise Kathryn Lindsay (3 years ago)
Easy walk up the hill. We couldn't go in. Possibly just temporary construction? The outside is worth a look and some pictures, though, as it is not far from town. Only about a 10 minute walk from the center.
Denise Kathryn Lindsay (3 years ago)
Easy walk up the hill. We couldn't go in. Possibly just temporary construction? The outside is worth a look and some pictures, though, as it is not far from town. Only about a 10 minute walk from the center.
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