San Giorgio Castle

La Spezia, Italy

The Castle of San Giorgio, overlooking the city of La Spezia, originates from a watchtower with the first castle on the site being built in 1262 by the ruler of the area Nicolò Fieschi with the intension of strengthen his domination in the area. Today only the base portion of the watchtower is preserved and this is included in the upper part of the structure.

In 1273 the castle was destroyed by the Genoese Republic under Oberto Doria, who captured, destroyed and plundered La Spezia. Nicolò Fieschi was forced to give up all his possessions to the Republic.

A century later, in the 1370s,  the castle was replaced by a new fortification and line of walls. This has been significantly enlarged and restored over the years and in 1443 the castle underwent significant work with the addition of the structure facing the valley, the design of which also enabled firearms to be used.

A century later, in the 1550s, construction of an important defensive addition called the 'Bastia', was added. In 1607, the castle was remodelled by the Genoese taking it to its present form and today the castle provides an imposing structure displaying many of its original features with its arrow slits dating back to the 14th century. It was at this time that its current walls were built.

The castle was for many years neglected but in 1985 work started go restore and conserve it. This did involve some modifications being undertaken to restore its design to a previous age, which involved the reconstruction of the ramp and removal of walls within the complex. It also involved the covering of some parts of the pavement with grating to enable the remains of the mediaeval structures found during the restoration to be left visible.With the final stage of the work was carried out between 1996 and 1998, when the upper part of the castle was completed. The coats-of-arms of the Republic of Genoa and the bas-relief of St. George and the dragon were again placed over the gateway.

The castle today houses an Archaeological Museum which exhibits objects dating back to the Neolithic, Copper, Bronze and Iron ages. It also contains an extensive display of Roman artefacts include objects excavated from the nearby Luni settlement. The exhibits include decorative marble busts and statues, as well as household utensils, coins and religious objects.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Finlay Porter (2 years ago)
The view is absolutely incredible, don't go the the museum unless you are really into archeology, it's kinda niche and a bit dull. You can get a ticket to just go up to the terrace and see the view and that is well worth it.
Esteban Merino (2 years ago)
Is in the heart of the city. There is a little train that you can take a city tour that passes by. But if you are walking around town you will find yourself in a street that everyone goes as there is a lot of stores, bars & restaurants. There is sign on the steet indicating with arrows how to get there. There in an elevator in certain point that is free of charge. That elevator will get you literally right across the main entrance. For few euros you can visit not only the castle but the museum inside. The views from the top are gorgeous.
Tanja Blažunaj Kranjec (3 years ago)
Loved it! Absolutely stunning.
Irit Cohen (3 years ago)
Good view point on the city building and harbour
Janet Griffiths (3 years ago)
Interesting museum of archaeological finds and breathtaking views.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Redipuglia World War I Memorial

Redipuglia is the largest Italian Military Sacrarium. It rises up on the western front of the Monte Sei Busi, which, in the First World War was bitterly fought after because, although it was not very high, from its summit it allowed an ample range of access from the West to the first steps of the Karstic table area.

The monumental staircase on which the remains of one hundred thousand fallen soldiers are lined up and which has at its base the monolith of the Duke of Aosta, who was the commanding officer of the third Brigade, and gives an image of a military grouping in the field of a Great Unity with its Commanding Officer at the front. The mortal remains of 100,187 fallen soldiers lie here, 39,857 of them identified and 60,330 unknown.