Tiglieto Abbey

Tiglieto, Italy

Tiglieto Abbey, founded in 1120, was the first Cistercian abbey to be founded in Italy, and also the first outside France. It was a daughter house of La Ferté Abbey. The first abbot was probably Opizzone. It may have gained the name Tiglieto after being given the estate of that name by the Margrave Anselm of Ponsone in 1131.

In 1442, through Pope Eugenius IV, Tiglieto became an abbey in commendam. In 1648 it was turned into a family estate of the last commendatory abbot, Cardinal Raggio, and dissolved. In 1747 the area was occupied by the Austrians, who shortly afterwards were driven out by the Genoese. In 2000 Tiglieto was reoccupied by the Cistercians.

The church is a primitive Romanesque brick basilica; the original side-chapels were removed in the 14th century to make way for a new east end. The nave was vaulted in the Baroque period, and a new choir at the west end was added at the same time, as was a Baroque campanile.

The conventual buildings are to the south of the church. The early Gothic chapter house in the east range has survived, with a square chapter room with nine bays from the early 13th century and symmetrical triforium windows looking onto the central courtyard and the site of the cloister, no longer extant, with the dormitory with bricked-up windows in the upper storey, as have the sacristy, the Fraternei and to the south the refectory building, as well as the lay brothers' block in the west, now converted for residential purposes.

The entire precinct was renovated for the new community that took over the premises in 2000.

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Details

Founded: 1120
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gianmarco Cerruti (11 months ago)
The place deserves 5 stars, but unfortunately it is somewhat left to itself. Too bad not being able to visit the structure or rest in the park with ancient trees. The circular route around the abbey is beautiful and well signposted.
Antonella Osmio (12 months ago)
Beautiful Abbey, visited only from the outside, all around a marvel! It can be reached from the free parking area with a picnic area nearby. Presence of bathrooms (there were people who complained that they were unusable). Around the clean forest where you can walk in peace !! Recommended destination for the whole family!
Massimo Balocco (12 months ago)
An enchanting and silent place, surrounding environment "of other times". Too bad the abbey wasn't open, but the rest around pays off. Free parking, the church is about 400 meters away. on foot from where you leave your car, camping is not allowed, picnic tables near the car park. Mountains and valleys around absolutely to be explored.
stefania ricci (13 months ago)
The abbey is beautiful, but the hiking ring has some things to review. Signage, especially in conjunction with the intersections with the asphalt road, lacking. A map of the excursion should be placed in the parking area, so as to photograph it and not have problems along the way. Beautiful views but a little ... Abandoned
riccardo sinelli (13 months ago)
Theoretically beautiful place, of great historicity, surrounded by greenery, among flowery meadows. Classic place that if they had it abroad would be very famous, highly valued. Too bad it is: - little known - very badly signposted on a road much traveled by mainly motorcyclists, to find it I had to turn around for 30 minutes because the navigator could not find it - parking with public toilets obviously closed and not accessible, uncut grass, practically abandoned - Obviously closed (Sunday afternoon at 4.00 pm) which can only be visited from the outside - in front of the Abbey all very badly kept (long grass, stacked tiles, etc.) - Large space behind the Abbey, fenced, green and flat with lots of large trees probably secular, which I imagined if we were abroad full of people maybe lying down to relax, enjoy nature, read etc., but obviously closed and with grass uncultivated I hope it is only a temporary condition because the place really deserves more enhancement
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