Palazzo Reale

Genoa, Italy

Construction of the present Palazzo Reale began in 1618 for the Balbi family. From 1643-1655, work renewed under the direction of the architects Pier Francesco Cantone and Michele Moncino. In 1677, the palace was sold to the Durazzo Family, who enlarged the palace under the designs of Carlo Fontana.

In 1823, the palace was sold to the Royal House of Savoy. From 1919, the palace has belonged to the state.

The palace contains much original furniture and decoration. Frescoes inside include the Glory of the Balbi Family by Valerio Castello and Andrea Sghizzi, Spring changing slowly to Winter by Angelo Michele Colonna and Agostino Mitelli, and Jove establishes Justice on the Earth by Giovanni Battista Carlone. It also contains canvases by Bernardo Strozzi, il Grechetto, Giovanni Battista Gaulli, Domenico Fiasella as well as Bassano, Tintoretto, Luca Giordano, Anthony van Dyck, Ferdinand Voet, and Guercino. It contains statuary by Filippo Parodi.

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Address

Via Balbi 4, Genoa, Italy
See all sites in Genoa

Details

Founded: 1618
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nour Bou Salman (6 months ago)
The palace is amazing but the staff wasn't very friendly. They could've been friendlier as they tried to kick us out several times saying it's because of time and covid and so on although the palace was practically empty for anyone other than us
Casper Føns (11 months ago)
Recommended: not too expensive and beautiful rooms
jake pagden (11 months ago)
I am a museum lover so my review might be a bit biased but I had a nice experience in the Royal Palace museum. You can listen to explanations recorded by Liceo Martin Luther King students which added a magic touch to the majestic rooms. Would recommend. The tour is pretty quick and the staff were talking very loudly about their lives which I found a bit rude
Sarah Hessler (12 months ago)
Smaller than expected, but nice.
Stephen Atkinson (12 months ago)
For €4 a very nice 40 mins, We enjoyed it but anymore would have been theft. It is possible that some exhibits were closed due to Covid?
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