Palazzo Reale

Genoa, Italy

Construction of the present Palazzo Reale began in 1618 for the Balbi family. From 1643-1655, work renewed under the direction of the architects Pier Francesco Cantone and Michele Moncino. In 1677, the palace was sold to the Durazzo Family, who enlarged the palace under the designs of Carlo Fontana.

In 1823, the palace was sold to the Royal House of Savoy. From 1919, the palace has belonged to the state.

The palace contains much original furniture and decoration. Frescoes inside include the Glory of the Balbi Family by Valerio Castello and Andrea Sghizzi, Spring changing slowly to Winter by Angelo Michele Colonna and Agostino Mitelli, and Jove establishes Justice on the Earth by Giovanni Battista Carlone. It also contains canvases by Bernardo Strozzi, il Grechetto, Giovanni Battista Gaulli, Domenico Fiasella as well as Bassano, Tintoretto, Luca Giordano, Anthony van Dyck, Ferdinand Voet, and Guercino. It contains statuary by Filippo Parodi.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Via Balbi 4, Genoa, Italy
See all sites in Genoa

Details

Founded: 1618
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

M R (3 months ago)
The Royal Palace, a delightful experience. Is my last day in Genova and I'm looking for an easy yet rewarding spot to visit. Wandering by Balbi street, I'm caught by the elegant entrance of a site, Is the Royal Palace. Asking for infos, I get told that today is free entry ( first sunday of the month ) and the visit only takes 1-2 Hr, sounds like a perfect opportunity. The visit gets along all the typical rooms of a 18th century " Reggia ": Ballroom, Reading rooms, Audience Chamber, Weapons Room etc.. with final view from the balcony on the port of Genova. The sight is just mesmerizing and fills with nostalgia.. the trip is almost over.
Margaret K (5 months ago)
Magnificent Palace with a lot to see, very friendly staff and reasonable price. Some beautiful pieces of furniture and great views from the terrace.
Rachael (5 months ago)
A small but worthwhile palace museum, with original room decor & furniture from the 18th century. Visitors have access to the palace rooms as well as a large balcony with views of the port & the sea, and an inner courtyard and garden below. You can buy the tickets online and bring them on your phone!
Andrew Meadowcroft (8 months ago)
Well worth a visit. We almost gave it a miss, but glad we decided to visit. Some lovely rooms and the dining hall with the chandeliers was the highlight.
Kim D (13 months ago)
Only €2 entry for students which is well worth it. The museum is open at really strange times but hey that's Italy. We only went in for the garden but then found the palace to be really gorgeous - definitely recommend a visit here. I think the garden would be better in the daylight and it wasn't lit very well.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Les Invalides

Les Invalides is a complex of buildings containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the building"s original purpose. The buildings house the Musée de l"Armée, the military museum of the Army of France, the Musée des Plans-Reliefs, and the Musée d"Histoire Contemporaine, as well as the burial site for some of France"s war heroes, notably Napoleon Bonaparte.

Louis XIV initiated the project in 1670, as a home and hospital for aged and unwell soldiers: the name is a shortened form of hôpital des invalides. The architect of Les Invalides was Libéral Bruant. The enlarged project was completed in 1676, the river front measured 196 metres and the complex had fifteen courtyards. Jules Hardouin Mansart assisted the aged Bruant, and the chapel was finished in 1679 to Bruant"s designs after the elder architect"s death.

Shortly after the veterans" chapel was completed, Louis XIV commissioned Mansart to construct a separate private royal chapel referred to as the Église du Dôme from its most striking feature. Inspired by St. Peter"s Basilica in Rome, the original for all Baroque domes, it is one of the triumphs of French Baroque architecture. The domed chapel is centrally placed to dominate the court of honour. It was finished in 1708.

Because of its location and significance, the Invalides served as the scene for several key events in French history. On 14 July 1789 it was stormed by Parisian rioters who seized the cannons and muskets stored in its cellars to use against the Bastille later the same day. Napoleon was entombed under the dome of the Invalides with great ceremony in 1840. In December 1894 the degradation of Captain Alfred Dreyfus was held before the main building, while his subsequent rehabilitation ceremony took place in a courtyard of the complex in 1906.

The building retained its primary function of a retirement home and hospital for military veterans until the early twentieth century. In 1872 the musée d"artillerie (Artillery Museum) was located within the building to be joined by the Historical Museum of the Armies in 1896. The two institutions were merged to form the present musée de l"armée in 1905. At the same time the veterans in residence were dispersed to smaller centres outside Paris. The reason was that the adoption of a mainly conscript army, after 1872, meant a substantial reduction in the numbers of veterans having the twenty or more years of military service formerly required to enter the Hôpital des Invalides. The building accordingly became too large for its original purpose. The modern complex does however still include the facilities detailed below for about a hundred elderly or incapacitated former soldiers.