Palazzo Reale

Genoa, Italy

Construction of the present Palazzo Reale began in 1618 for the Balbi family. From 1643-1655, work renewed under the direction of the architects Pier Francesco Cantone and Michele Moncino. In 1677, the palace was sold to the Durazzo Family, who enlarged the palace under the designs of Carlo Fontana.

In 1823, the palace was sold to the Royal House of Savoy. From 1919, the palace has belonged to the state.

The palace contains much original furniture and decoration. Frescoes inside include the Glory of the Balbi Family by Valerio Castello and Andrea Sghizzi, Spring changing slowly to Winter by Angelo Michele Colonna and Agostino Mitelli, and Jove establishes Justice on the Earth by Giovanni Battista Carlone. It also contains canvases by Bernardo Strozzi, il Grechetto, Giovanni Battista Gaulli, Domenico Fiasella as well as Bassano, Tintoretto, Luca Giordano, Anthony van Dyck, Ferdinand Voet, and Guercino. It contains statuary by Filippo Parodi.

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Address

Via Balbi 4, Genoa, Italy
See all sites in Genoa

Details

Founded: 1618
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

MG Raghavan (8 months ago)
Stopped by this place in Genova. You can also see university of Genova just opposite to this beautiful building.
Gisele Lopes (8 months ago)
First of all, we loved genoa! We were on a 4h free walking tour with Spyros from hostel Manena and he showed us an amazing city. That said, Palazzo Reale did not disappointed us and had a lot of history to show, as the whole city does. I was specially thrilled with the warming welcome of the receptionist, that even let us walk back to the throne room to take a picture with the crown on and took pictures of both of us. It's 6 euros and it's a great museum, so I recommend you to go
Hinnerk Spindler (8 months ago)
Well worth the visit, the palace interiors are awesome and the views from the terrace as well. Every room has detailed descriptions in all necessary languages.
Darryn T (12 months ago)
No crowds to battle with as we wandered from room to room. Even had palace bedroom and the frescoes were beautiful. As were the many chandeliers. Worth a visit
Patten Welding (12 months ago)
This palace and museum was built in the 1600s and redeveloped over time. It has 18 rooms open to the public, all of which are phenomenal. This is a gem, a kind of little Versailles hidden in the Old City and overlooking the busy port. The surroundings and entrance-façade are not so great, but the palace itself is just amazing, you cannot miss it.
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