Bereguardo Castle

Bereguardo, Italy

Bereguardo Castle, also called the Castello Visconteo of Bereguardo, was built in the first half of the 14th century, commissioned by Luchino Visconti to present a defense to the western borders of the Milan. It was also used as a winter residence and hunting lodge by Galeazzo II Visconti.

By the 15th century some refurbishment was pursued by Filippo Maria Visconti, who also constructed the Naviglio di Bereguardo, a canal linking to the Naviglio Grande.

The Duke Francesco I Sforza granted the castle to then Lord of Bereguardo, Giovanni Maruzzi da Tolentino, a captain and counselor to the Duke. In 1648, and it remained in this family's possession till the 18th century. After passing through a number of owners, it was donated in 1897 to the commune by the engineer Giulio Pisa. Presently, it houses city hall and the town library.

Originally, the castle was a square, made of brick, but the northern wing was razed. The southern end maintains a moated bridge and shows the original crenellations. The Eastern end has a bifore or single mullioned window. The castle lost a surrounding wall and the interiors are highly modified.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sarb Ghuman (23 months ago)
Very nice place
Mina Polizzi (2 years ago)
Esternamente cade a pezzi. Transenne e puntelli messi, rovinano la vista. A parte questo, è un edificio piuttosto attivo che accoglie anche diverse manifestazioni durante l'anno, secondo me potrebbe fare MOLTO di più !!
J P Giammattei (2 years ago)
Nice place!!!!
Gattinaelegante . (2 years ago)
The office of my daughter's pediatrician is in the castle and there is the town municipality as well, but not much else.
Carlo M. Bajetta (3 years ago)
Nice from the outside, but... You can only visit the courtyard. Do not confuse the castle itself with the local pizzeria (which is not bad, apparently...).
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