Lancut Synagogue

Łańcut, Poland

The Łańcut Synagogue is a rare surviving example of the vaulted synagogues with a bimah-tower, that were built throughout the Polish lands in masonry from the sixteenth through the early nineteenth centuries.

The synagogue is a simple Baroque, masonry building with a vestibule and side room, main hall and a women's balcony above the vestibule reached by an exterior staircase. The windows of the main hall are unusually large for a Polish synagogue; Krinsky believes that this may reflect the security of the Jews in Łańcut, who lived under the protection of the landowning family. The synagogue is built with eight, barrel-vaulted bays around a central Bimah, the four, massive, masonry pillars of which support the ceiling and roof. Painted, decorative plasterwork adorns the pillar capitals, ceiling, and walls. The floor in the restored building is made of concrete. The walls are decorated reproductions of the pre-war paintings. They feature traditional Jewish subjects, such as Noah and the Ark, symbols of the Zodiac, and images of musical instruments mentioned in the Book of Psalms.

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Address

3 Maja 15, Łańcut, Poland
See all sites in Łańcut

Details

Founded: 1761
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Przewodnik Krakowski M.Leszczuk (3 months ago)
Ufundowana przez właściciela zamku Stanisława Lubomirskiego w miejscu dawnej, drewnianej ( druga połowa XVIII w. ). Wewnątrz odrestaurowane polichromie z czasów fundacji po dwudziestowieczne. Zachowana arka ( miejsce przechowywania Tory ), monumentalna bima ( podniesienie, skąd czytano modlitwy ) i babiniec ( miejsce modlitwy kobiet ). Robi wrażenie!
Anna Warchoł (4 months ago)
Mandatory point.
Ceribe Kagami (3 years ago)
A small but beautiful synagogue.
Chaim Green (4 years ago)
Very historical place
Aniko Radnai (5 years ago)
Amazing inside. It is among the most beatuful churches.
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