Ruins of the Monastery of the Discalced Carmelites

Zagórz, Poland

In the village Zagorz on a picturesque hill called Marymont there are the impressive ruins of the monastery of the Discalced Carmelites - one of the most interesting architectural buildings in this part of Poland shrouded in many legends.

The ruins of the monastery of Fr. Discalced Carmelites from the eighteenth century. The ruins are situated on a picturesque hill on three sides surrounded by the waters of the Osława River. The construction of the monastery was completed before 1730, it is a Baroque defensive complex, built of local sandstone. The founder of the monastery was Jan Franciszek Stadnicki. The gate leads to the ruins of the fortified walls, fitted with bullet holes, pointing to the only road leading directly to the monastery. Now it is possible to get too the ruins by Klasztorna Street or Rzeczna Street.

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Details

Founded: 1730
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

www.poland.travel

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eugene Elijah Ong (2 years ago)
Beautiful serene place, perfect for that quiet thoughtful walk.
Eugene Elijah Ong (2 years ago)
Beautiful serene place, perfect for that quiet thoughtful walk.
Artur Przybylski (2 years ago)
Top fav place in Zagorz
Artur Przybylski (2 years ago)
Top fav place in Zagorz ?
Marcin Wilusz (2 years ago)
Great place to visit to relax and contemplate with God.
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