St. James Church

Powroźnik, Poland

St. James Church dates from the seventeenth or eighteenth-century. Together with different tserkvas it is designated as part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site 'Wooden tserkvas of the Carpathian region in Poland and Ukraine'.

The tserkva in Powroźnik has existed since around 1600, but only a part of the former structure remains, arranged into the sacristy of the present tserkva. The architecture of the present tserkva was constructed between the seventeenth and eighteenth-century, with a major reconstruction in 1813. The tserkva was moved from its former location due to the danger posed by flooding, after which it was expanded. After Operation Vistula the tserkva was transformed to a Roman Catholic church.

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Founded: 17th century
Category: Religious sites in Poland

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Fabrizio Lucchese (2 years ago)
It is located 32 km from Bardejov and, on the road we travel towards the Tatra mountains, we decide to make the detour, lengthening slightly to see this and a second church. The detour runs along a path surrounded by nature up to this village. The church is closed but very beautiful in the autumn colors of the early morning. The impression it gives is that it has recently been completely restored. Clean exterior wood, impregnated or varnished. The view of the whole is beautiful, the small external altar on the north side is interesting. The 2 statuettes, probably just installed, in 2 niches on the sides of the main entrance gate are lovely. A table outside that summarizes the churches in the area convinces us that ... I have to organize a second trip to this area, but next time on the Polish side.
joan gasull (2 years ago)
They are great, very beautiful to look at and if you understand construction you still give it more value
morris prislovsky (2 years ago)
I personally have never been there. My aunt has a few times though. My family attended church baptized, married and funerals for many centuries. I’m told that family records in the church Bible date back nearly 700 years. Been told this structure was built in 1739 being dubbed as the new church. Previous church burned. Maybe some day I will be able to visit the area and walk the same grounds as my ancestors did.
morris prislovsky (2 years ago)
I personally have never been there. My aunt has a few times though. My family attended church baptized, married and funerals for many centuries. I’m told that family records in the church Bible date back nearly 700 years. Been told this structure was built in 1739 being dubbed as the new church. Previous church burned. Maybe some day I will be able to visit the area and walk the same grounds as my ancestors did.
Słowik Boski (2 years ago)
Meeting history is always an interesting experience. Looking at the works of human hands that are hundreds of years old, it is impossible not to be amazed. It is puzzling how the natural environment in some regions better influences the longevity of the works of human hands. It is worth stopping for a moment here. I recommend.
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