Castro de Santa Trega

A Guarda, Spain

Castro de Santa Trega is a Galician fort and archaeological site located on the hillsides of Mount Santa Trega. The site is strategically located overlooking the mouth of the river Miño. Belonging to the Castro culture, it is the most emblematic and visited Galician fort.

Santa Trega is a ‘Castro-Roman’ settlement. It was inhabited between 100 BC and 100 AD, in a period when the process of Romanisation of the northwest of the Iberian peninsula had already begun. Despite this, the construction system reflects techniques that respect the Castro tradition and has seen very little Roman influence. This style is dominated by the use of circular structures. Only a small percentage of the estimated size of the settlement has been excavated so far. At present only the northern part, excavated in the 80s, and some structures at the top of the mountain are open to visitors. It is bordered by a wall which surrounds a stretch of land more than 700 metres north-south by 300 metres east-west. However, these measurements are not confirmed to be accurate.

Proof of a human presence approximately 2,000 years prior to the settlement's construction is confirmed by the petroglyphs or rock engravings left in various locations in that area. Many of these petroglyphs were concealed by structures raised during the construction of the fort. The Laja del Mapa’ also known as the Laja Sagrada (Sacred Rock), is the better known of the geometric representations that are still visible. Situated on the highest part of the hill, the engraving is made up of various spirals, concentric circles and roughly parallel lines. It is evident that these engravings have no relation to the fort, since they are a product of a society that developed 2,000 years before, during the final stage of the Galician Neolithic period.

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Founded: 100 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mark Horton (2 months ago)
Remarkable spot with wonderful views out over Guarda.
Rosa Maria Quintana Lehminger (10 months ago)
Very interesting celtic city
Rosa Maria Quintana Lehminger (10 months ago)
Very interesting celtic city
Ve Rena (11 months ago)
We were surprised to discover this place and it's definitely worth a visit. The view is awesome but most importantly it makes Galician Celtic history quite tangible.
Ve Rena (11 months ago)
We were surprised to discover this place and it's definitely worth a visit. The view is awesome but most importantly it makes Galician Celtic history quite tangible.
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