Co-Cathedral of Santa María

Vigo, Spain

Co-Cathedral of Santa María, popularly known as La Colegiata, is one of the best examples of religious architecture in Vigo, an exponent of neoclassical art in Galicia and the city’s most important temple. It is the co-cathedral with Tui Cathedral.

Located in Vigo’s Old Town, it was built in 1811 over the remains of a previous church and commissioned from Melchor de Prado y Mariño. This basilica with three naves has a facade with simple ornamentation and a unique sundial on its right side, which curiously does not face south.

The Church of Santa María houses the image of the Cristo de la Victoria, arguably Vigo’s most important religious emblem: it leaves in procession the first Sunday of August, along with tens of thousands of devoted followers. It also happens to be the first event of the Vigo Festival.

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Address

Praza Igrexa 10, Vigo, Spain
See all sites in Vigo

Details

Founded: 1811
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.turismodevigo.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mervi Wennerstrand (19 months ago)
Very nice view over the city, church is on the mountain you can go there by elevator (train)
katie ritzka (2 years ago)
Lovely cultural cathedral, with beauty. A lovely place to see in vigo
Shane Pearce (2 years ago)
Not much to look at from outside but lovely inside quite and peaceful... Not happy some Spanish woman told my very ill uncle to shut up and shook some beads at him, throat cancer so he can't talk proper and can't eat or drink bless him, but she went as soon as she came. But still glad we visted
Gerard Fleming (2 years ago)
This simply dressed cathedral is very calming. All of the walls and even the ceilings around the alter have some individual stories and on closer inspection are done in mosaic. The detail is actually stunning. Yea liked this cathedral.
Joseph Rodriguez (2 years ago)
Went to mass, what else can I say. It is a nice church/cathedral, some of my favorite saints.
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