Top Historic Sights in Örebro, Sweden

Explore the historic highlights of Örebro

Örebro Castle

For over 700 years Örebro Castle has kept a watchful eye on everyone crossing the bridge on the River Svartån. The oldest part of the castle, a defence tower, was erected in the latter half of the 13th century. This tower was added to in the 14th century to make a larger stronghold. The castle was expanded during the reign of the royal family Vasa between 1573-1627 to the impressive Renaissance castle. After Vasa famil ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Örebro, Sweden

St. Nicholas’ Church

The building of three-nave stone church dedicated to St. Nicholas was started in the late 1200s, but not completed until mid-1300s. The western tower was erected in the 15th century. Engelbrekt Engelbrektsson, a Swedish rebel leader against Kalmar Union and later statesman, was probably buried to the church after he was murdered in 1436. The church was restored in 1860-1899. The appearance has been influenced by English ...
Founded: Late 1200s | Location: Örebro, Sweden

Wadköping Open Air Museum

Wadköping open-air museum with its wooden buildings and courtyards gives an idea of what Örebro's buildings and city environment used to look like. Wadköping has been located here since its opening in 1965 and comprises buildings and courtyards moved here from central Örebro. A town street runs through the middle of Wadköping with buildings on either side. One side, with its low-proportioned, red- ...
Founded: 1965 | Location: Örebro, Sweden

Karlslund Manor

Originally, in the 16th century, the site of the Manor House and gardens was used for royal farm buildings and Karlslund was mainly concerned with agriculture. The present Karlslund Manor House was built between 1804 and 1809 by Christian Günther. In 1819 a later owner, Carl Anckarsvärd, had the manor house rebuilt and altered to the appearance we know today. The architect behind this work was the famous Carl Ch ...
Founded: 1804-1809 | Location: Örebro, Sweden

Almby Church

Almby Church is the oldest one in Örebro. According the Dendrochronological investigation the oldest part, a choir, was built around the year 1120. The church was enlarged during the 13th century and modified again in the 15th century. The sacristy was added in the 16th century. In 1656 let baron Gustav Eriksson Leijonhufvud to build a chapel to the church. The church’s font dates from the Middle Ages. The sma ...
Founded: ca. 1120 | Location: Örebro, Sweden

Rinkaby Church

The oldest parts of Rinkaby church were completed probably in the late 1100s. It was enlarged to the west and the sacristy was added sometimes in the 1200s or early 1300s. The vaulting was added in the late 1400s and the chapel in 1620. The major restoration was made 1779-1780 and in 1839 the current tower replaced the medieval one.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Örebro, Sweden

Kägleholm Castle Ruins

Kägleholm Castle was Built in the 1670s by chancellor Magnus Gabriel de la Gardie. It was designed by Nicodemus Tessin the Elder. History of the castle is short, since in 1712 it burned down and was never rebuilt. Today only cellar ruins remain of the castle.
Founded: 1670s | Location: Örebro, Sweden

Esplunda Manor

Esplunda estate was established in 1616. The current manor house was built in 1872 and it was enlarged to the Baroque-style appearance in 1904. Wings date from the 18th century. Esplunda has a very significant library with 15,000 books and manuscripts dating from the 1600-1700s.
Founded: 17th century | Location: Örebro, Sweden

Dylta Bruk

The first sulfur factory in Dylta was mentioned in 1558. It was first owned by the Crown. In 1649 Queen Christina gave mill to Henrik Barckhusen. The Privy Council baron Samuel Åkerhielm became in 1739 the owner of Dylta Mill, which belonged to the family Åkerhielm in 265 years. The main building, which is built in wood, dates back to the 1740s. In the 1850s, the well-known architect J.F. Åbom designed ...
Founded: 1558 | Location: Örebro, Sweden

Hovsta Church

Hovsta church is a brick church and its oldest parts date from the 12th century. The western portal and tower were added in the 1200s and the sacristy in 1500s. The font pedestal, made of sandstone, dates from the 1100s. The font itself was made in the end of the 18th century, as well as the altarpiece. The pulpit was constructed in 1830s.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Örebro, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Jelling Runestones

The Jelling stones are massive carved runestones from the 10th century, found at the town of Jelling in Denmark. The older of the two Jelling stones was raised by King Gorm the Old in memory of his wife Thyra. The larger of the two stones was raised by King Gorm's son, Harald Bluetooth in memory of his parents, celebrating his conquest of Denmark and Norway, and his conversion of the Danes to Christianity. The runic inscriptions on these stones are considered the most well known in Denmark.

The Jelling stones stand in the churchyard of Jelling church between two large mounds. The stones represent the transitional period between the indigenous Norse paganism and the process of Christianization in Denmark; the larger stone is often cited as Denmark's baptismal certificate (dåbsattest), containing a depiction of Christ. They are strongly identified with the creation of Denmark as a nation state and both stones feature one of the earliest records of the name 'Danmark'.

After having been exposed to all kinds of weather for a thousand years cracks are beginning to show. On the 15th of November 2008 experts from UNESCO examined the stones to determine their condition. Experts requested that the stones be moved to an indoor exhibition hall, or in some other way protected in situ, to prevent further damage from the weather.

Heritage Agency of Denmark decided to keep the stones in their current location and selected a protective casing design from 157 projects submitted through a competition. The winner of the competition was Nobel Architects. The glass casing creates a climate system that keeps the stones at a fixed temperature and humidity and protects them from weathering. The design features rectangular glass casings strengthened by two solid bronze sides mounted on a supporting steel skeleton. The glass is coated with an anti-reflective material that gives the exhibit a greenish hue. Additionally, the bronze patina gives off a rusty, greenish colour, highlighting the runestones' gray and reddish tones and emphasising their monumental character and significance.