Top Historic Sights in Örebro, Sweden

Explore the historic highlights of Örebro

Örebro Castle

For over 700 years Örebro Castle has kept a watchful eye on everyone crossing the bridge on the River Svartån. The oldest part of the castle, a defence tower, was erected in the latter half of the 13th century. This tower was added to in the 14th century to make a larger stronghold. The castle was expanded during the reign of the royal family Vasa between 1573-1627 to the impressive Renaissance castle. After Vasa famil ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Örebro, Sweden

St. Nicholas’ Church

The building of three-nave stone church dedicated to St. Nicholas was started in the late 1200s, but not completed until mid-1300s. The western tower was erected in the 15th century. Engelbrekt Engelbrektsson, a Swedish rebel leader against Kalmar Union and later statesman, was probably buried to the church after he was murdered in 1436. The church was restored in 1860-1899. The appearance has been influenced by English ...
Founded: Late 1200s | Location: Örebro, Sweden

Wadköping Open Air Museum

Wadköping open-air museum with its wooden buildings and courtyards gives an idea of what Örebro's buildings and city environment used to look like. Wadköping has been located here since its opening in 1965 and comprises buildings and courtyards moved here from central Örebro. A town street runs through the middle of Wadköping with buildings on either side. One side, with its low-proportioned, red- ...
Founded: 1965 | Location: Örebro, Sweden

Karlslund Manor

Originally, in the 16th century, the site of the Manor House and gardens was used for royal farm buildings and Karlslund was mainly concerned with agriculture. The present Karlslund Manor House was built between 1804 and 1809 by Christian Günther. In 1819 a later owner, Carl Anckarsvärd, had the manor house rebuilt and altered to the appearance we know today. The architect behind this work was the famous Carl Ch ...
Founded: 1804-1809 | Location: Örebro, Sweden

Almby Church

Almby Church is the oldest one in Örebro. According the Dendrochronological investigation the oldest part, a choir, was built around the year 1120. The church was enlarged during the 13th century and modified again in the 15th century. The sacristy was added in the 16th century. In 1656 let baron Gustav Eriksson Leijonhufvud to build a chapel to the church. The church’s font dates from the Middle Ages. The sma ...
Founded: ca. 1120 | Location: Örebro, Sweden

Rinkaby Church

The oldest parts of Rinkaby church were completed probably in the late 1100s. It was enlarged to the west and the sacristy was added sometimes in the 1200s or early 1300s. The vaulting was added in the late 1400s and the chapel in 1620. The major restoration was made 1779-1780 and in 1839 the current tower replaced the medieval one.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Örebro, Sweden

Kägleholm Castle Ruins

Kägleholm Castle was Built in the 1670s by chancellor Magnus Gabriel de la Gardie. It was designed by Nicodemus Tessin the Elder. History of the castle is short, since in 1712 it burned down and was never rebuilt. Today only cellar ruins remain of the castle.
Founded: 1670s | Location: Örebro, Sweden

Esplunda Manor

Esplunda estate was established in 1616. The current manor house was built in 1872 and it was enlarged to the Baroque-style appearance in 1904. Wings date from the 18th century. Esplunda has a very significant library with 15,000 books and manuscripts dating from the 1600-1700s.
Founded: 17th century | Location: Örebro, Sweden

Dylta Bruk

The first sulfur factory in Dylta was mentioned in 1558. It was first owned by the Crown. In 1649 Queen Christina gave mill to Henrik Barckhusen. The Privy Council baron Samuel Åkerhielm became in 1739 the owner of Dylta Mill, which belonged to the family Åkerhielm in 265 years. The main building, which is built in wood, dates back to the 1740s. In the 1850s, the well-known architect J.F. Åbom designed ...
Founded: 1558 | Location: Örebro, Sweden

Hovsta Church

Hovsta church is a brick church and its oldest parts date from the 12th century. The western portal and tower were added in the 1200s and the sacristy in 1500s. The font pedestal, made of sandstone, dates from the 1100s. The font itself was made in the end of the 18th century, as well as the altarpiece. The pulpit was constructed in 1830s.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Örebro, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Klis Fortress

From its origin as a small stronghold built by the ancient Illyrian tribe Dalmatae, becoming a royal castle that was the seat of many Croatian kings, to its final development as a large fortress during the Ottoman wars in Europe, Klis Fortress has guarded the frontier, being lost and re-conquered several times. Due to its location on a pass that separates the mountains Mosor and Kozjak, the fortress served as a major source of defense in Dalmatia, especially against the Ottoman advance, and has been a key crossroad between the Mediterranean belt and the Balkan rear.

Since Duke Mislav of the Duchy of Croatia made Klis Fortress the seat of his throne in the middle of the 9th century, the fortress served as the seat of many Croatia"s rulers. The reign of his successor, Duke Trpimir I, the founder of the Croatian royal House of Trpimirović, is significant for spreading Christianity in the Duchy of Croatia. He largely expanded the Klis Fortress, and in Rižinice, in the valley under the fortress, he built a church and the first Benedictine monastery in Croatia. During the reign of the first Croatian king, Tomislav, Klis and Biograd na Moru were his chief residences.

In March 1242 at Klis Fortress, Tatars who were a constituent segment of the Mongol army under the leadership of Kadan suffered a major defeat while in pursuit of the Hungarian army led by King Béla IV. After their defeat by Croatian forces, the Mongols retreated, and Béla IV rewarded many Croatian towns and nobles with 'substantial riches'. During the Late Middle Ages, the fortress was governed by Croatian nobility, amongst whom Paul I Šubić of Bribir was the most significant. During his reign, the House of Šubić controlled most of modern-day Croatia and Bosnia. Excluding the brief possession by the forces of Bosnian King, Tvrtko I, the fortress remained in Hungaro-Croatian hands for the next several hundred years, until the 16th century.

Klis Fortress is probably best known for its defense against the Ottoman invasion of Europe in the early 16th century. Croatian captain Petar Kružić led the defense of the fortress against a Turkish invasion and siege that lasted for more than two and a half decades. During this defense, as Kružić and his soldiers fought without allies against the Turks, the military faction of Uskoks was formed, which later became famous as an elite Croatian militant sect. Ultimately, the defenders were defeated and the fortress was occupied by the Ottomans in 1537. After more than a century under Ottoman rule, in 1669, Klis Fortress was besieged and seized by the Republic of Venice, thus moving the border between Christian and Muslim Europe further east and helping to contribute to the decline of the Ottoman Empire. The Venetians restored and enlarged the fortress, but it was taken by the Austrians after Napoleon extinguished the republic itself in 1797. Today, Klis Fortress contains a museum where visitors to this historic military structure can see an array of arms, armor, and traditional uniforms.