The first sulfur factory in Dylta was mentioned in 1558. It was first owned by the Crown. In 1649 Queen Christina gave mill to Henrik Barckhusen. The Privy Council baron Samuel Åkerhielm became in 1739 the owner of Dylta Mill, which belonged to the family Åkerhielm in 265 years.

The main building, which is built in wood, dates back to the 1740s. In the 1850s, the well-known architect J.F. Åbom designed the Manor House in its present palace-like appearance. The buildings environment is classified as being of national historical interest. 

Dylta Bruk is a well-preserved and unique industrial environment with roots in the 16th century, where the passage of time can clearly be perceived. The adjacent Manor House with its farm buildings reinforces the impression of an industrial production deeply rooted in Swedish tradition.

Many buildings and installations bear witness to an earlier, almost 400-year period as a mill. Sulphur was produced on an industrial scale as early as 1583. The production was later supplemented with vitriol, alum and red paint.

Today Dylta offers fishing, hunting and event services.

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Details

Founded: 1558
Category: Industrial sites in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

More Information

www.dyltabruk.se

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

OneTad (2 years ago)
Underbar plats o fantastisk julmarknAd kommer tillbaka nästa år
Anette Westerlind (2 years ago)
Trevlig atmosfär där allt finns som man önskar tiil julen!
Therese Rydberg Mattsson (2 years ago)
Trevlig julmarknad med härlig matinslag. Fanns mycket att smaka och köpa med hen till skafferiet. Lite geggig parkering där många som körde fast tyvärr. Är klart värt ett besök till nästa jul igen.
Kalle Anka Ankeborg (2 years ago)
Julmarknad. Inträde, skrämmande! Varför? Trångt och svårt att komma fram bland alla trevliga människor och bråte.
Veronica Östergren (2 years ago)
Jättemysig julmarknad idag. Underbart med de som stod/gick runt och spelade musik. Var EXTREMT trångt och svåråtkomligt för de med handikapp. jättefin omgivning, det märktes verkligen att de lagt omtanke bakom detta.
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