The first sulfur factory in Dylta was mentioned in 1558. It was first owned by the Crown. In 1649 Queen Christina gave mill to Henrik Barckhusen. The Privy Council baron Samuel Åkerhielm became in 1739 the owner of Dylta Mill, which belonged to the family Åkerhielm in 265 years.

The main building, which is built in wood, dates back to the 1740s. In the 1850s, the well-known architect J.F. Åbom designed the Manor House in its present palace-like appearance. The buildings environment is classified as being of national historical interest. 

Dylta Bruk is a well-preserved and unique industrial environment with roots in the 16th century, where the passage of time can clearly be perceived. The adjacent Manor House with its farm buildings reinforces the impression of an industrial production deeply rooted in Swedish tradition.

Many buildings and installations bear witness to an earlier, almost 400-year period as a mill. Sulphur was produced on an industrial scale as early as 1583. The production was later supplemented with vitriol, alum and red paint.

Today Dylta offers fishing, hunting and event services.

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Dylta bruk 268, Örebro, Sweden
See all sites in Örebro

Details

Founded: 1558
Category: Industrial sites in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

More Information

www.dyltabruk.se

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