Top Historic Sights in Eslöv, Sweden

Explore the historic highlights of Eslöv

Eslöv Museum

Eslöv Museum lies in the heart of the town. It was established in 2000 and is contained within a former merchant’s house from the late nineteenth century. The museum’s permanent exhibition traces the development of the settlement from a small farming village to a thriving commercial centre as the railways arrived. The museum also hosts changing temporary exhibitions on themes with some relevance to the ...
Founded: 2000 | Location: Eslöv, Sweden

Skarhult Castle

The magnificent Skarthult Castle was built in the 1560s in the Renaissance style by Sten Skarholt Rosensparre, althoughs some parts remain from the elder fortification. An earlier building on the same place is mentioned in the 1350s when Danish judge John Nielsen owned the farm. Later Skarhult castle was owned by famous noble families Brahe and De la Gardie. It was renewed in 1840s when owned by Jules von Schwer. The med ...
Founded: 1560s | Location: Eslöv, Sweden

Trollenäs Castle

Trollenäs Castle is known since the 14th century, and has been in the ownership of only two families, Thott and Trolle. Originally known as Näs Castle, it was renamed after Trolle family in the 18th century. The current building goes back to 1559 and was in the late 19th century renovated by architect Ferdinand Meldahl to resemble a French Renaissance castle. There is also a medieval church, Näs old church, near the c ...
Founded: 1559 | Location: Eslöv, Sweden

Västra Sallerup Church

The church Västra Sallerup, built in the late 12th century, is famous of its medieval frescoes. The fresco of Queen Margrethe I has been used on a Danish stamp. The beautiful pulpit is made by Jakob Kremberg, who lived in Lund between 1596-1641. To west of the church is a former vicarage built in 1867-1868.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Eslöv, Sweden

Hjularöd Castle

Hjularöd Castle was first mentioned in 1391, but the current castle was built in 1894-1897. It was built on command of the former owner, chamberlain Hans Gustaf Toll. French medieval castles, the château de Pierrefonds in particular, were inspiration for the castle when architects Isak Gustaf Clason and Lars Israel Wahlman designed it. Outside scenes from the television series Mysteriet på Greveholm (The ...
Founded: 1894-1897 | Location: Eslöv, Sweden

Örtofta Castle

Örtofta manor was first mentioned in 1346 and it has been owned by several noble families. The original brick castle was built in the late 1400s and parts of it still remains. In 1857-1861 Henry Dücker enlarged and reconstructed Örtofta to the present appearance. Today the castle hosts a hotel and provides conference and wedding services.
Founded: 15th century | Location: Eslöv, Sweden

Ellinge Castle

Ellinge Castle is one of Scania's oldest country seats, dating from the 13th century. The origins of the current castle building dates from the 15th century. It is still surrounded by Medieval moats. In the 18th century the Danish fortress was transformed into an open mansion of traditional Swedish style. The tower like structure was added in the middle of the 19th century. Today there are only remnants of the former for ...
Founded: 15th century | Location: Eslöv, Sweden

Viderup Castle

Viderup Manor was built at the beginning of the 17th century by Anne Brahe. The main building represents the Renaissance style and is surrounded by a moat. The exterior is still mainly original. Since 18th century the castle has been owned by Ramel family and is today a farm.
Founded: 1617-1623 | Location: Eslöv, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Externsteine Stones

The Externsteine (Extern stones) is a distinctive sandstone rock formation located in the Teutoburg Forest, near the town of Horn-Bad Meinberg. The formation is a tor consisting of several tall, narrow columns of rock which rise abruptly from the surrounding wooded hills. Archaeological excavations have yielded some Upper Paleolithic stone tools dating to about 10,700 BC from 9,600 BC.

In a popular tradition going back to an idea proposed to Hermann Hamelmann in 1564, the Externsteine are identified as a sacred site of the pagan Saxons, and the location of the Irminsul (sacral pillar-like object in German paganism) idol reportedly destroyed by Charlemagne; there is however no archaeological evidence that would confirm the site's use during the relevant period.

The stones were used as the site of a hermitage in the Middle Ages, and by at least the high medieval period were the site of a Christian chapel. The Externsteine relief is a medieval depiction of the Descent from the Cross. It remains controversial whether the site was already used for Christian worship in the 8th to early 10th centuries.

The Externsteine gained prominence when Völkisch and nationalistic scholars took an interest in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This interest peaked under the Nazi regime, when the Externsteine became a focus of nazi propaganda. Today, they remain a popular tourist destination and also continue to attract Neo-Pagans and Neo-Nazis.