Skarhult Castle

Eslöv, Sweden

The magnificent Skarthult Castle was built in the 1560s in the Renaissance style by Sten Skarholt Rosensparre, althoughs some parts remain from the elder fortification. An earlier building on the same place is mentioned in the 1350s when Danish judge John Nielsen owned the farm.

Later Skarhult castle was owned by famous noble families Brahe and De la Gardie. It was renewed in 1840s when owned by Jules von Schwer. The medieval Skarhult church is located to the castle park. Today Skarhult is privately owned and not open to the public.

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EDDIE said 6 years ago
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Details

Founded: 1560s
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Katherin Wiklöf (11 months ago)
Not stroller friendly. Just an old castle that is poorly maintained. Interesting, but few displays. Cafe run by the owners gets 5 stars though.
Virág Sóthy (15 months ago)
Nice park, not so nice staff
Pavel Modilaynen (16 months ago)
Small but interesting exhibition
Anne Berg (16 months ago)
Lovely guided tours
Jorg Floren (16 months ago)
A privately owned castle. Parts of it have been opened up for the public. Very nice and authentic atmosphere
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