Hjularöd Castle

Eslöv, Sweden

Hjularöd Castle was first mentioned in 1391, but the current castle was built in 1894-1897. It was built on command of the former owner, chamberlain Hans Gustaf Toll. French medieval castles, the château de Pierrefonds in particular, were inspiration for the castle when architects Isak Gustaf Clason and Lars Israel Wahlman designed it. Outside scenes from the television series Mysteriet på Greveholm (The mystery at Greveholm) in 1996 were filmed in the courtyard of the castle. The castle since 1926 is owned by the Bergengren family and is not open for the public.

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Details

Founded: 1894-1897
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pax Agelii (4 years ago)
Very beautiful! Very nice park and nice of the owners to make it public. Perfect little pit stop for anyone interested in castles :) well maintained, quiet and peaceful. Little smelly due to pigs I suppose..
Bjarne Breschel (5 years ago)
Very beautiful small castle, it possible to go for a walk around the castle, but otherwise the place do not cater for visitors.
Sebastian F (5 years ago)
Really beautiful! Would have gotten that last star if it were possible to enter the premises. But understand that someone is living there.
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