Trollenäs Castle

Eslöv, Sweden

Trollenäs Castle is known since the 14th century, and has been in the ownership of only two families, Thott and Trolle. Originally known as Näs Castle, it was renamed after Trolle family in the 18th century. The current building goes back to 1559 and was in the late 19th century renovated by architect Ferdinand Meldahl to resemble a French Renaissance castle.

There is also a medieval church, Näs old church, near the castle. The castle is open to the public, offering facilities for weddings, conferences, dinners, and other festivities. In the park there is a café.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.
  • Wikipedia

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Address

1271 Näs, Eslöv, Sweden
See all sites in Eslöv

Details

Founded: 1559
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Klaus Bigum (2 months ago)
Beautiful and very well looked after Trollenäs castle. Stunning grounds/park. The slots cafe serves home baked pastries. Well worth a visit
Vishal Kondabathini (5 months ago)
A well maintained castle, clean cut grass, shaped trees and has a great walk circles around the Castle for small strolls with kids or a relaxing walk in the garden and the woods around. The place is so welcoming. It has a cute little café where everything is home baked and from the local farms. Best time to visit is during an evening of a sunny day when the Café is open.
Andreea Galetschi (5 months ago)
Wonderful and misterious. The garden is open to the visitors and it's beautiful.
Richard Mctiernan (13 months ago)
Warning the new policy states you can only buy fika if you buy a sandwich. Seemingly to reduce numbers. Seems to have worked was quiet when we visited and we for one won't be coming back until they change the policy.
Örn Enok (15 months ago)
Good place and nice castle. I recommend.
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