Trollenäs Castle

Eslöv, Sweden

Trollenäs Castle is known since the 14th century, and has been in the ownership of only two families, Thott and Trolle. Originally known as Näs Castle, it was renamed after Trolle family in the 18th century. The current building goes back to 1559 and was in the late 19th century renovated by architect Ferdinand Meldahl to resemble a French Renaissance castle.

There is also a medieval church, Näs old church, near the castle. The castle is open to the public, offering facilities for weddings, conferences, dinners, and other festivities. In the park there is a café.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.
  • Wikipedia

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Address

1271 Näs, Eslöv, Sweden
See all sites in Eslöv

Details

Founded: 1559
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Amy LeBlanc (11 months ago)
Went here for a wedding, and it was an absolute fairytale weekend! 10/10!
Peter O'Reilly (14 months ago)
Beautiful... free... nice little cafe on the grounds... worth a weekend stroll :)
Frans Roselius (2 years ago)
Good fika, I can just assume that the lunch is just as good. The environment makes it really worth the trip.
Emanuel Johansson (2 years ago)
Super cozy and calm. Perfect for a sunday stroll and coffee.
Patrik Olofsson (3 years ago)
Great little cafe. Beautiful location. Definitely worth a detour. Don't miss it if you are in the area.
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