Castles in Occitanie

Château de Balsac

Château de Balsac consists of several buildings built between the 16th and 17th centuries. It was damaged by fire in 1570. and it was rebuilt.
Founded: 16th century | Location: Druelle Balsac, France

Château de Planèzes

Château de Planèzes was built in the 15th century. Today it is privately owned.
Founded: 15th century | Location: Luc-la-Primaube, France

Château d'Esplas

Château d"Esplas consists of a square form building with three round and one square tower. It dates to the 13th century. During the Hundred Years" War it was sieged by English army and reinforced in 1376. The newer buildings date from the 16th-17th centuries.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Rebourguil, France

Château de Theyrargues

Château de Theyrargues was built 14th century. The 15th century main building still exists with corner towers. Today it is privately owned.
Founded: 14th century | Location: Rivières, France

Château de Fayet

The first lords of Brusque and Fayet were the viscounts of Albi in the 11th century, the viscounts of Béziers and Carcassonne in the 12th century, the counts of Toulouse in the 13th century, and, finally, the lords of Castelnau-Bretenoux in the 14th century. In the 16th century, the daughter of Guy de Castelnau, Jacquette de Clermont, married Jean V de Arpajon and her dowry was used for the restorati ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Fayet, France

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.