Castles in Occitanie

Château de Pailhès

Château de Pailhès is a fine example of medieval military architecture. It was built in the 12th century and reconstructed during 15th, 16th and 18th centuries. Today the castle is privately owned.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Pailhes, France

Château de Margon

The imposing Château de Margon consists of a rectangular building flanked with three towers. It dates from the early 13th century and was attached to the Kingdom of France in 1221. Le Moine de Margon family has owned the castle since 1719. Two side wings were added inside the courtyard of the 16th century. Château de Margon has also remarkable gardens.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Margon, France

Château de Pagax

Château de Pagax was built in the 13th century, the oldest mention dates from 1259. During the Renaissance the castle was rebuilt, and large windows were pierced to the walls.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Flagnac, France

Château de Valmirande

Built from scratch starting in 1892 by Baron de Lassus. Historic monument with a picturesque 100-acre park of character. The castle and its outbuildings were built by the architect Louis Garros.
Founded: 1892 | Location: Montréjeau, France

Château d'Avensac

Château d"Avensac was built in the 14th century and rebuilt in 1830 .
Founded: 14th century | Location: Avensac, France

Château de Caumont

Château de Caumont consists of two buildings on a vast esplanade overlooking the Save river valley. The old castle built on the site of a fortified castle that belonged to Gaston Phoebus. The present Renaissance castle whose construction lasted from 1525 to 1535. The castle sits on two levels of underground vaults, it is flanked by four strong towers so that openings and slits control the facades. Two octagonal towers a ...
Founded: 1525-1535 | Location: Cazaux-Savès, France

Château de Beaumont

The Château de Beaumont was constructed in the 14th century. Significant building work was carried out in the 15th, 17th and 18th centuries.
Founded: 14th century | Location: Gers, France

Château de Herrebouc

The Château de Herrebouc is a castle in the commune of Saint-Jean-Poutge. Though an older building, the present look of the castle is the result of a major campaign of construction work at the start of the 17th century. On the ground floor, the 17th century ceiling is partially conserved. The farm buildings date from this period. The pigeon loft is characteristic of the architecture of the time of Henri IV (reig ...
Founded: 17th century | Location: Saint-Jean-Poutge, France

Château de Cantepau

Château de Cantepau current appearance was built by Delecouls family around 1746, but the original castle dates from the 15th century.
Founded: 15th century | Location: Albi, France

Château de Mailhoc

Château de Mailhoc was first documented in 1227. The square form castle with corner towers played role in Hundred Years" War and Wars of Religion. Later it was altered in to Renaissance style.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Mailhoc, France

Château de Montgey

Perched on a hill overlooking the plain of Revel, Château de Montgey is beautiful private castle built in the 12th, 13th and 17th centuries and the church and its newly restored tower. If it is difficult to date the first castle, there is no doubt that it existed at the beginning of the 13th century. During the crusade of the Albigenses, in spring 1211, the Crusaders suffered a crushing defeat at the Battle of Montgey. ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Montgey, France

Château de Graves

Château de Graves, while in its original state, was built between 1543 and 1555. In France, rare are the architectural evidence, characterizing the second Renaissance, arrived at our time in such good condition. Free access to the ground floor, the chapel, refectory and garden.
Founded: 1543 | Location: Villefranche-de-Rouergue, France

Château de Pomayrols

Château de Pomayrols may have been built in the 10th century. Its existence is attested since 1261 in the marriage certificate of Guillemette the Pons de Cayrodes" sister. The current castle, at least what us remains about it, was completed in 1446. It results from rehandlings and enlargings carried out on the castle of origin.
Founded: 15th century | Location: Pomayrols, France

Château de Durfort

Château de Durfort was erected on a rocky piton which overlooks the valley of the Orbieu. The present ruins are those of a strengthened habitat, including a chapel, dwellings with rectangular windows and a tower. High thick walls, cellars and wells, arched rooms of square buildings, corner turrets, watch towers and a main tower are still visible. There is no documentary evidence for the initial construction of this fort ...
Founded: 11th century | Location: Vignevieille, France

Château de Calberte

Mentioned in documents from 1092, Calberte was one of the numerous feudal castles standing in the Cévenol valleys. It was hold turns by turns by Anduze and Budos families and was under the jurisdiction of Château des Portes. Abandoned at the end of the 14th century or at the beginning of the 15th century, it faded from memories until nowadays. Nobody could remember that the very name of Saint Germain de Calberte stems f ...
Founded: 11th century | Location: Saint-Germain-de-Calberte, France

Château de Miral

The Château de Miral overlooks the confluent of the Runes River and Tarn River. It belonged in the 13th century to the Cahbrieres family and from the 14th century to the Malbosc family. Its keep was built towards the end of the 13th century as the seat of the Malbosc-Miral family. Its ramparts defended access to the upper Tarn valley. From the 14th to the 16th centuries, the Lords of Malbosc-Miral constructed t ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Bédouès, France

Château de Bertholène

Château de Bertholène history dates from early 12th century. The enclosure, several meters high, was equipped with numerous defensive elements. The castle was conquered and destroyed several times during its long existence. Since the early 19th century it has been abandoned and ruined.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Bertholène, France

Château des Bourines

Château des Bourines was built as fortified barn in the 13th century. The courtyard is protected by a curtain wall flanked by four corner towers.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Bertholène, France

Château de Galinières

Galinières was originally dependent on the Bonneval abbey of Bonneval, constituted from donations of noble families of the region and the bishops of Rodez between 1163 and 1181. The current structure was built mainly in the late 14th century and 15th century.
Founded: 14th century | Location: Pierrefiche, France

Château de Loupiac

Château de Loupiac was built in the 13th century. It is flanked with four round towers. The castle played an important role during the wars of Religion where it was caught and taken over by both sides. It was also conquered during the Revolution and burned down. Today it is privately owned.w
Founded: 13th century | Location: Lapanouse, France

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Charlottenburg Palace

Charlottenburg Palace is the largest palace in Berlin and the only surviving royal residence in the city dating back to the time of the Hohenzollern family. The original palace was commissioned by Sophie Charlotte, the wife of Friedrich III, Elector of Brandenburg in what was then the village of Lietzow. Originally named Lietzenburg, the palace was designed by Johann Arnold Nering in baroque style. The inauguration of the palace was celebrated on 11 July 1699, Frederick's 42nd birthday.

Friedrich crowned himself as King Friedrich I in Prussia in 1701 (Friedrich II, known as Frederick the Great, would later achieve the title King of Prussia). Two years previously, he had appointed Johann Friedrich von Eosander (also known as Eosander von Göthe) as the royal architect and sent him to study architectural developments in Italy and France, particularly the Palace of Versailles. On his return in 1702, Eosander began to extend the palace, starting with two side wings to enclose a large courtyard, and the main palace was extended on both sides. Sophie Charlotte died in 1705 and Friedrich named the palace and its estate Charlottenburg in her memory. In the following years, the Orangery was built on the west of the palace and the central area was extended with a large domed tower and a larger vestibule. On top of the dome is a wind vane in the form of a gilded statue representing Fortune designed by Andreas Heidt. The Orangery was originally used to overwinter rare plants. During the summer months, when over 500 orange, citrus and sour orange trees decorated the baroque garden, the Orangery regularly was the gorgeous scene of courtly festivities.

Inside the palace, was a room described as 'the eighth wonder of the world', the Amber Room, a room with its walls surfaced in decorative amber. It was designed by Andreas Schlüter and its construction by the Danish amber craftsman Gottfried Wolfram started in 1701. Friedrich Wilhelm I gave the Amber Room to Tsar Peter the Great as a present in 1716.

When Friedrich I died in 1713, he was succeeded by his son, Friedrich Wilhelm I whose building plans were less ambitious, although he did ensure that the building was properly maintained. Building was resumed after his son Friedrich II (Frederick the Great) came to the throne in 1740. During that year, stables for his personal guard regiment were completed to the south of the Orangery wing and work was started on the east wing. The building of the new wing was supervised by Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff, the Superintendent of all the Royal Palaces, who largely followed Eosander's design. The decoration of the exterior was relatively simple but the interior furnishings were lavish. The ground floor was intended for Frederick's wife Elisabeth Christine, who, preferring Schönhausen Palace, was only an occasional visitor. The decoration of the upper floor, which included the White Hall, the Banqueting Hall, the Throne Room and the Golden Gallery, was lavish and was designed mainly by Johann August Nahl. In 1747, a second apartment for the king was prepared in the distant eastern part of the wing. During this time, Sanssouci was being built at Potsdam and once this was completed Frederick was only an occasional visitor to Charlottenburg.

In 1786, Frederick was succeeded by his nephew Friedrich Wilhelm II who transformed five rooms on the ground floor of the east wing into his summer quarters and part of the upper floor into Winter Chambers, although he did not live long enough to use them. His son, Friedrich Wilhelm III came to the throne in 1797 and reigned with his wife, Queen Luise for 43 years. They spent much of this time living in the east wing of Charlottenburg. Their eldest son, Friedrich Wilhelm IV, who reigned from 1840 to 1861, lived in the upper storey of the central palace building. After Friedrich Wilhelm IV died, the only other royal resident of the palace was Friedrich III who reigned for 99 days in 1888.

The palace was badly damaged in 1943 during the Second World War. In 1951, the war-damaged Stadtschloss in East Berlin was demolished and, as the damage to Charlottenburg was at least as serious, it was feared that it would also be demolished. However, following the efforts of Margarete Kühn, the Director of the State Palaces and Gardens, it was rebuilt to its former condition, with gigantic modern ceiling paintings by Hann Trier.

The garden was designed in 1697 in baroque style by Simeon Godeau who had been influenced by André Le Nôtre, designer of the gardens at Versailles. Godeau's design consisted of geometric patterns, with avenues and moats, which separated the garden from its natural surroundings. Beyond the formal gardens was the Carp Pond. Towards the end of the 18th century, a less formal, more natural-looking garden design became fashionable. In 1787 the Royal Gardener Georg Steiner redesigned the garden in the English landscape style for Friedrich Wilhelm II, the work being directed by Peter Joseph Lenné. After the Second World War, the centre of the garden was restored to its previous baroque style.