Castles in Occitanie

Château de Rudelle

The Château de Rudelle is a 16th and 17th century castle in the commune of Muret. The castle is noted for its ancient chimneys and for murals painted on the third floor. It was built by Guillaume de Rudelle, the son of Jean de Rudelle, a counsellor to the king. In 1783, Jean-Marie-Joseph Ingres, the father of the famous artist Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, stayed there and painted several ceilings. At the Fr ...
Founded: 16th century | Location: Muret, France

Château de Saint-Élix-Séglan

The castle was originally constructed in the 14th century, with developments in the 15th and 17th century. The Château de Saint-Elix is a modest fortified house situated on the summit of a hill dominating the valley of the Noue River. It consists of a mediaeval nucleus, a tower-house from the 14th-15th centuries and a two-storey house built in the 17th century.
Founded: 14th century | Location: Saint-Élix-Séglan, France

Château du Prince Noir

Château du Prince Noir was built around the year 1500, but dungeon dates from the 14th century. Today it is restored and in private use.
Founded: c. 1500 | Location: Arcizans-Avant, France

Château de Lasserre

The Château de Lasserre is a ruined castle in the commune of Béraut. With origins in the 14th century, the castle was adapted and altered in the 16th and 18th centuries. It is privately owned.
Founded: 14th century | Location: Béraut, France

Château de Loubersan

Château de Loubersan was built in the 11th century as a fortified mansion. It was expanded and altered during the late Middle Ages. The moated castle is today privately owned.  
Founded: 11th century | Location: Loubersan, France

Château de Bouvées

Château de Bouvées was built between 1530 and 1560 by Monseigneur de Saint-Julien, Bishop of Aire-sur-Adour, on the ruins of an earlier structure. At the time of the French Revolution, it was sold as a national asset. The building consisted of three wings enclosing an inner courtyard, flanked in the corners by round towers. Only the east and south parts remain, the agricultural buildings attached to the ancient walls ...
Founded: 1530 | Location: Labrihe, France

Château du Garrané

The Château du Garranée was originally constructed in the 11th century. It was modified in the 13th, 14th and 15th centuries. A tower is all that remains of another castle, believed to be 13th century, belonging to the abbots of Faget. The ground floor had no openings other than a small bay in the southern wall. It represented the typical medieval military architecture of the region. It was already in ruins at the Fren ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Seissan, France

Château de Boissezon

Château de Boissezon was first mentioned in 966 or 996 AD. According old documents, it had originally five round towers an spacious rooms and annexed buildings. Today only one tower remains.  
Founded: 10th century AD | Location: Murat-sur-Vèbre, France

Château de Brametourte

Château de Brametourte, founded in the 11th century, surveys a stunning panorama across 20 hectares of parkland, woods & sun-flowered fields towards the Pyrenean peaks. Situated in the south of France, close to the award winning bastide village of Lautrec, central to three UNESCO World Heritage sites, Toulouse, Albi and Carcassonne, the tranquil beauty of this ancient home of Barons & Viscounts, belies its tur ...
Founded: 11th century | Location: Lautrec, France

Château de Campan

Château de Campan may have been built originally in the 11th century and its history is connected to Knights Templar according local legends. The current appearance dates mainly from the 16th and 17th centuries.
Founded: 11th century | Location: d'Anglès, France

Château de Canac

Château de Canac was built in 1180 and rebuilt in the 16th century. Today only ruins remain.
Founded: 1180 | Location: Murat-sur-Vèbre, France

Château de Combefa

Château de Combefa was built in the 13th century to protect the route between Rodez and Toulouse. It was owned by the bishops of Albi. The chapel was built in 1474-1503. The castle was demolished in 1761.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Combefa, France

Château d'Hauterive

Château d"Hauterive was built in the 13-14th centuries, but medieval castle has been altered heavily later. It is surrounded by a moat.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Castres, France

Château de Mayragues

The Château de Mayragues (12th - 17th century) and its pigeon loft built on 4 columns, both listed as Historic Buildings, surrounded by its bio-dynamic vineyard, sit proudly in the midst of the magnificent rolling countryside of the Bastides Albigeoises. The Château de Mayragues is one of the few remaining examples of the regional fortified architecture with a half-timbered, overhanging gallery surrounding the top of th ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Castelnau-de-Montmiral, France

Château de Malvignol

Château de Malvignol was first time mentioned in 1258. It was rebuilt in residential style after the French Wars of Religion.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Lautrec, France

Château de Montespieu

Château de Montespieu is a neo-medieval fortress located in Navès. Built on foundations dating back to the twelfth century, it was completely rebuilt in the sixteenth century, rebuilt in the seventeenth and restored in 1900. The castle Montespieu is a vast rectangle which has the features of a neo-medieval fortress. It is flanked by seven towers, three in the main body and four pavilions constructed of square.
Founded: 16th century | Location: Naves, France

Château de Padiès

The Château de Padiès is a unique Renaissance château complex. The history of Padiès firmly place it within its historic and geographic context. It has been established that the château existed at least before 1209. The Seigneurs were Cathar sympathisers and records from the Inquisition through to the 13th century are testimony to this. During the Wars of Religion, the château was attacked and pillaged by the Prote ...
Founded: 16th century | Location: Lempaut, France

Château de Saint-Hippolyte

Château de Saint-Hippolyte was first time documented in 1313. The current appearance dates from the 17th and 19th centuries. The square form castle has chapel.
Founded: 14th century | Location: Monestiés, France

Château de Saint-Michel-de-Vax

Château de Saint-Michel-de-Vax (not open), built between 1200 and 1250, was responsible for building the village. The Lord of St Michel Lacombe, Empire General, was born in 1753 and died there in 1812 after a distinguished career immortalized in the 'Georgics' by Claude Simon, one of his descendants, Nobel Prize for Literature in 1985.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Saint-Michel-de-Vax, France

Château de Trévien

Château de Trévien was built in the 15th-16th centuries. The square form castle has towers in every corners.
Founded: 15th century | Location: Trévien, France

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Hagios Demetrios

The Church of Saint Demetrius, or Hagios Demetrios, is the main sanctuary dedicated to Saint Demetrius, the patron saint of Thessaloniki. It is part of the site Palaeochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki on the list of World Heritage Sites by UNESCO since 1988.

The first church on the spot was constructed in the early 4th century AD, replacing a Roman bath. A century later, a prefect named Leontios replaced the small oratory with a larger, three-aisled basilica. Repeatedly gutted by fires, the church eventually was reconstructed as a five-aisled basilica in 629–634. This was the surviving form of the church much as it is today. The most important shrine in the city, it was probably larger than the local cathedral. The historic location of the latter is now unknown.

The church had an unusual shrine called the ciborium, a hexagonal, roofed structure at one side of the nave. It was made of or covered with silver. The structure had doors and inside was a couch or bed. Unusually, it did not hold any physical relics of the saint. The ciborium seems to have been a symbolic tomb. It was rebuilt at least once.

The basilica is famous for six extant mosaic panels, dated to the period between the latest reconstruction and the inauguration of the Byzantine Iconoclasm in 730. These mosaics depict St. Demetrius with officials responsible for the restoration of the church (called the founders, ktetors) and with children. An inscription below one of the images glorifies heaven for saving the people of Thessalonica from a pagan Slavic raid in 615.

Thessaloniki became part of the Ottoman Empire in 1430. About 60 years later, during the reign of Bayezid II, the church was converted into a mosque, known as the Kasımiye Camii after the local Ottoman mayor, Cezeri Kasım Pasha. The symbolic tomb however was kept open for Christian veneration. Other magnificent mosaics, recorded as covering the church interior, were lost either during the four centuries when it functioned as a mosque (1493–1912) or in the Great Thessaloniki Fire of 1917 that destroyed much of the city. It also destroyed the roof and upper walls of the church. Black-and-white photographs and good watercolour versions give an idea of the early Byzantine craftsmanship lost during the fire.

Following the Great Fire of 1917, it took decades to restore the church. Tombstones from the city"s Jewish cemetery - destroyed by the Greek and Nazi German authorities - were used as building materials in these restoration efforts in the 1940s. Archeological excavations conducted in the 1930s and 1940s revealed interesting artifacts that may be seen in a museum situated inside the church"s crypt. The excavations also uncovered the ruins of a Roman bath, where St. Demetrius was said to have been held prisoner and executed. A Roman well was also discovered. Scholars believe this is where soldiers dropped the body of St. Demetrius after his execution. After restoration, the church was reconsecrated in 1949.