Castles in Scania

Tunbyholm Castle

Tunbyholm castle was built in between 1634-1640 and it may be the best example of so-called Renaissance style of Christian IV of Denmark. The main building has today two floors and two annexes. It is privately owned and not open to the public.
Founded: 1634-1640 | Location: Smedstorp, Sweden

Snogeholm Castle

Snogeholm farm dates from the 16th century and it was owned by Thott, Brahe, Marsvin and Bille families. In the 1690s Christian Bille built the new main building between two detached wings. The current castle was built by Erik Claes Piper in 1870. The French Rococo style building has two storeys and three towers. The German Emperor Wilhelm II visited in Snogeholm in 1899 and 1902. Today Snogeholm castle hosts a hotel and ...
Founded: 1870 | Location: Sjöbo, Sweden

Gyllebohus

Gyllebohus was a medieval Danish castle. The earliest known owner was Verner Brahe in 1280. The stone castle was built between 1538-1544 Laurids Lauridsen Knob and was one of the largest castles in Scania. It was burned down several times in wars, the latest destruction happened in 1700. Today some fragments remain of Gyllebohus. The adjacent manor house was built Hedwig Sofia Schönström in 1813-1818 and it is p ...
Founded: 1538-1544 | Location: Gärsnäs, Sweden

Hjularöd Castle

Hjularöd Castle was first mentioned in 1391, but the current castle was built in 1894-1897. It was built on command of the former owner, chamberlain Hans Gustaf Toll. French medieval castles, the château de Pierrefonds in particular, were inspiration for the castle when architects Isak Gustaf Clason and Lars Israel Wahlman designed it. Outside scenes from the television series Mysteriet på Greveholm (The ...
Founded: 1894-1897 | Location: Eslöv, Sweden

Osbyholm Castle

The farm Ousbygård was first mentioned in 1405, but the current Osbyholm castle was built in the first half of the 17th century by Lene Ramel. The square-formed castle is surrounded by a moat and there is a rare octagonal tower, which dates from the 1570s. The castle was damaged in the Scanian War (1675-1679). Captain Georg Christian Cook started the major restoration in 1750s. The castle was enlarged and the inter ...
Founded: early 1600s | Location: Hörby, Sweden

Sinclairsholm Castle

Sinclairsholm estate was established in 1620 by Anders Sinclair. The current main building was built in 1788 after the previous one was damaged by fire. Today the estate hosts a restaurant, which is available for parties, weddings etc.
Founded: 1788 | Location: Vinslöv, Sweden

Rössjöholm Castle

The first known owner of Rössjöholm castle was Danish knight Olof Geed around the year 1500. Later it was owned for example by Leijonsköld, Silfverskiöld, Sjöcrona families. The first strong castle was built in 1553 and it had even seven towers. The castle was destroyed by Swedish forces in 1676, but some ruins of this castle still remains. The new main building was built in 1696, but it was destr ...
Founded: 1731 | Location: Munka-ljungby, Sweden

Vegeholm Castle

Vegeholm Castle was first built as a danish castle in the early 16th century, and was burned in 1525. It was rebuilt again in 1630 by the Danish Tyge Krabbe. It was owned by his family until 1663, when it was bought by Gustaf Otto Stenbock. After his death it was first possessed by Olof Nilsson Engelholm and thereafter by Johan Cedercrantz. His family owned Vegeholm Castle until 1814 when it was thoroughly renovated. It c ...
Founded: 16th century | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Lindholmen Castle Ruins

Lindholmen Castle is a former Danish fortified castle on the banks of lake Börringe. It became an important fortification in the defence of Scania during the Middle Ages because of its strong encircling defensive walls and double moats. At the time, a small river and treacherous marshes made the terrain surrounding the castle hard to navigate. Originally a private castle, it was in 1339 turned over to Magnus Eriksson ...
Founded: 14th century | Location: Svedala, Sweden

Sövdeborg Castle

Sövdeborg area belonged to bishops of Lund in the Middle Ages, but after Reformation the Crown of Denmark sold it to Frederik Lange in 1587. He built the new castle to the southern side of small Sövdesjön lake between 1590-1597. It consisted of a moat, tower and central section with two wings. Count Erik Piper made an major reconstruction to the castle in 1840-1844. Sövdeborg is open to the public. Th ...
Founded: 1590-1597 | Location: Sjöbo, Sweden

Bjärsjöholm Castle

Bjärsjöholm or Bjersjöholm Castle is a Renaissance castle from the 16th century. Originally consisting of four brick buildings built around a courtyard, the present castle consists of two buildings, with a newer addition close by. According the excavations there has been a manor already in the Middle Ages. The site is first mentioned in 1344. Since the 14th century it has been owned by families Munk, Rotfe ...
Founded: 16th century | Location: Ystad, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Castle Rushen

Castle Rushen is located in the Isle of Man"s historic capital, Castletown. The castle is amongst the best examples of medieval castles in the British Isles, and is still in use as a court house, museum and educational centre.

The exact date of castle is unknown, although construction is thought to have taken place during the reigns of the late 12th century and early 13th century rulers of the Isle of Man – the Kings of Mann and the Isles. The original Castle Rushen consisted of a central square stone tower, or keep. The site was also fortified to guard the entrance to the Silver Burn. From its early beginnings, the castle was continually developed by successive rulers of Mann between the 13th and 16th century. The limestone walls dominated much of the surrounding landscape, serving as a point of dominance for the various rulers of the Isle of Man. By 1313, the original keep had been reinforced with towers to the west and south. In the 14th century, an east tower, gatehouses, and curtain wall were added.

After several more changes of hands the English and their supporters eventually prevailed. The English king Edward I Longshanks claimed that the island had belonged to the Kings of England for generations and he was merely reasserting their rightful claim to the Isle of Man.

The 18th century saw the castle in steady decay. By the end of the century it was converted into a prison. Even though the castle was in continuous use as a prison, the decline continued until the turn of the 20th century, when it was restored under the oversight of the Lieutenant Governor, George Somerset, 3rd Baron Raglan. Following the restoration work, and the completion of the purpose-built Victoria Road Prison in 1891, the castle was transferred from the British Crown to the Isle of Man Government in 1929.

Today it is run as a museum by Manx National Heritage, depicting the history of the Kings and Lords of Mann. Most rooms are open to the public during the opening season (March to October), and all open rooms have signs telling their stories. The exhibitions include a working medieval kitchen where authentic period food is prepared on special occasions and re-enactments of various aspects of medieval life are held on a regular basis, with particular emphasis on educating the local children about their history. Archaeological finds made during excavations in the 1980s are displayed and used as learning tools for visitors.