Castles in Scania

Bjärsjöholm Castle

Bjärsjöholm or Bjersjöholm Castle is a Renaissance castle from the 16th century. Originally consisting of four brick buildings built around a courtyard, the present castle consists of two buildings, with a newer addition close by. According the excavations there has been a manor already in the Middle Ages. The site is first mentioned in 1344. Since the 14th century it has been owned by families Munk, Rotfe ...
Founded: 16th century | Location: Ystad, Sweden

Bellinga Castle

Bellinga Castle was first mentioned in 1346 and in the 16th century it became a seat farm of Sövdeborg. Since 1860 it has been owned by Piper Family. Elizabeth Piper and her husband Carl Fredrik Hochschild built then the present, manor-style main building. Today Bellinga is in private use and not open to the public.
Founded: 1860s | Location: Ystad, Sweden

Bjärsjölagård Castle

There was originally a strong fortified castle Beritzholm few hundred meters from the present Bjärsjölagård Castle. It was built by Valdemar Atterdag in the 1300s and demolished in 1526. Peter Julius Coyet bought the estate from Crown in 1720. There was a lime factory in the beginning of the 19th century and two ovens still remain. The current main building was built in Rococo style in 1766 and the souther ...
Founded: 1766-1850 | Location: Sjöbo, Sweden

Kulla Gunnarstorp Castle

In the late 1400s Kulla Gunnarstorp was known as Gundestrup and it belonged to the Pardsberg family. In the mid-1500s it was acquired by Jörgen Brahe, who built the older castle which still exists. After him it has been owned by famous Sparre, De la Gardie and de Geer families. The newer castle was built by Baltzar von Platen in 1865-1868. This was designed by Danish architect Christian Zwingmann. Today the estate is ...
Founded: 1550s | Location: Helsingborg, Sweden

Sinclairsholm Castle

Sinclairsholm estate was established in 1620 by Anders Sinclair. The current main building was built in 1788 after the previous one was damaged by fire. Today the estate hosts a restaurant, which is available for parties, weddings etc.
Founded: 1788 | Location: Vinslöv, Sweden

Sövdeborg Castle

Sövdeborg area belonged to bishops of Lund in the Middle Ages, but after Reformation the Crown of Denmark sold it to Frederik Lange in 1587. He built the new castle to the southern side of small Sövdesjön lake between 1590-1597. It consisted of a moat, tower and central section with two wings. Count Erik Piper made an major reconstruction to the castle in 1840-1844. Sövdeborg is open to the public. Th ...
Founded: 1590-1597 | Location: Sjöbo, Sweden

Toppeladugård Castle

Toppeladugård was originally farm of the Häckeberga castle. It was divided as an estate in 1720 by Christina Piper. The current two-storey main building and two wings were built in 1918-1920 by the design of Lars Johan Lehming. Today it is privately owned.
Founded: 1918-1920 | Location: Genarp, Sweden

Vegeholm Castle

Vegeholm Castle was first built as a danish castle in the early 16th century, and was burned in 1525. It was rebuilt again in 1630 by the Danish Tyge Krabbe. It was owned by his family until 1663, when it was bought by Gustaf Otto Stenbock. After his death it was first possessed by Olof Nilsson Engelholm and thereafter by Johan Cedercrantz. His family owned Vegeholm Castle until 1814 when it was thoroughly renovated. It c ...
Founded: 16th century | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Viderup Castle

Viderup Manor was built at the beginning of the 17th century by Anne Brahe. The main building represents the Renaissance style and is surrounded by a moat. The exterior is still mainly original. Since 18th century the castle has been owned by Ramel family and is today a farm.
Founded: 1617-1623 | Location: Eslöv, Sweden

Charlottenlund Castle

Charlottenlund castle (or manor) lies in the countryside about eight kilometres west of Ystad. The present stately home was built in 1849 and is influenced by the medieval Romanesque style. It is surrounded by beautiful landscaped gardens. It possesses an excellent collection of art from the Nordic world. There is also a fine library. Guided tours are offered to groups by arrangement.
Founded: 1849 | Location: Ystad, Sweden

Örup Castle

Örup Castle was completed around the year 1500. Together with Glimmingehus, Bollerup and Tosterup, the castles were built as defenses in an uncertain and dangerous time, when the Swedes and Danes fought over power and lords believed they must protect their own soil against both external enemies. Örup was first mentioned in 1437 when it was owned by Danish family Qvitzow. Later it has been a residence of Flemmin ...
Founded: ca. 1500 | Location: Tomelilla, Sweden

Högestad Castle

Högestad was the property of Lund Archbishop in the Middle Ages. After Reformation it was returned to the Crown. In 1635 the estate was acquired by Palle Rosenkrantz. He built the present main building. In 1682 Högestad was once again returned to the King of Sweden and in 1706 Carl XII of Sweden decided to sell it to Carl Piper. Today Högestad is one of the largest farms in Sweden.
Founded: 1635 | Location: Ystad, Sweden

Tunbyholm Castle

Tunbyholm castle was built in between 1634-1640 and it may be the best example of so-called Renaissance style of Christian IV of Denmark. The main building has today two floors and two annexes. It is privately owned and not open to the public.
Founded: 1634-1640 | Location: Smedstorp, Sweden

Smedstorp Castle

Smedstorp Castle was owned by noble family Bing between 1313-1589. Later it has been a residence of families Quitzow, Bülow and Kruus. The present main building was originally the great hall of the castle built in the 16th century. Today there is no more remains of the original castle. Smedstorp is not open to the public.
Founded: 16th century | Location: Smedstorp, Sweden

Dybäck Castle

Dybäck estate was first mentioned in the 1300s. It was owned by several Danish noble families like Munck, Bille and Marsvin. In 1684 it was divided between Jorgen and Christian Bille. Their family owned the estate until 1857. The oldest building is a barracks, built in the late 1400s. The main building was built in the 1500s and enlarged about hundred years later. Today Dybäck is privately owned and not open to the pub ...
Founded: 15th century | Location: Skivarp, Sweden

Börringekloster Castle

Börringekloster Castle, formerly Börringe Priory, is a castle built in 1763 on the ruins of a medieval Benedictine priory. The priory was founded about 1150 under Eskil, Archbishop of Lund, for Benedictine monks. However, by 1231 Börringe Priory is mentioned in Liber Census Daniae as a nunnery located on the island of Byrdingø in Börringe Lake, on land which Valdemar II of Denmark had once set a ...
Founded: 1763 | Location: Börringe, Sweden

Barsebäck Castle

Barsebäck Castle has existed in various versions at its present location since the 12th century. It received its current shape during a major renovation and rebuilding in 1889 and 1940. The current main structure is a three-story 19th-century reconstruction in Dutch Renaissance style, made to resemble the many original Renaissance castles still remaining in the Scanian landscape. After the Scanian War, Barsebäc ...
Founded: 16th century | Location: Barsebäck, Sweden

Björnstorp Castle

Björnstorp Castle was built in 1752 and reshaped in 1860-1880, with its final appearance set in 1868, by architect Helgo Zettervall. The original builder was Christina Törnflyckt who was married to famous stateman Carl Piper. The castle represents romantic Rococo style.
Founded: 1752 | Location: Genarp, Sweden

Garsnäs Castle

The history of Garsnäs estate dates from the 13th century, but the current castle was built in the 1500-1600s. It has been owned by several families and the Crown of Sweden during the centuries. Today Garsnäs castle provides wedding and event services.
Founded: 16th century | Location: Gärsnäs, Sweden

Gyllebohus

Gyllebohus was a medieval Danish castle. The earliest known owner was Verner Brahe in 1280. The stone castle was built between 1538-1544 Laurids Lauridsen Knob and was one of the largest castles in Scania. It was burned down several times in wars, the latest destruction happened in 1700. Today some fragments remain of Gyllebohus. The adjacent manor house was built Hedwig Sofia Schönström in 1813-1818 and it is p ...
Founded: 1538-1544 | Location: Gärsnäs, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Charlottenburg Palace

Charlottenburg Palace is the largest palace in Berlin and the only surviving royal residence in the city dating back to the time of the Hohenzollern family. The original palace was commissioned by Sophie Charlotte, the wife of Friedrich III, Elector of Brandenburg in what was then the village of Lietzow. Originally named Lietzenburg, the palace was designed by Johann Arnold Nering in baroque style. The inauguration of the palace was celebrated on 11 July 1699, Frederick's 42nd birthday.

Friedrich crowned himself as King Friedrich I in Prussia in 1701 (Friedrich II, known as Frederick the Great, would later achieve the title King of Prussia). Two years previously, he had appointed Johann Friedrich von Eosander (also known as Eosander von Göthe) as the royal architect and sent him to study architectural developments in Italy and France, particularly the Palace of Versailles. On his return in 1702, Eosander began to extend the palace, starting with two side wings to enclose a large courtyard, and the main palace was extended on both sides. Sophie Charlotte died in 1705 and Friedrich named the palace and its estate Charlottenburg in her memory. In the following years, the Orangery was built on the west of the palace and the central area was extended with a large domed tower and a larger vestibule. On top of the dome is a wind vane in the form of a gilded statue representing Fortune designed by Andreas Heidt. The Orangery was originally used to overwinter rare plants. During the summer months, when over 500 orange, citrus and sour orange trees decorated the baroque garden, the Orangery regularly was the gorgeous scene of courtly festivities.

Inside the palace, was a room described as 'the eighth wonder of the world', the Amber Room, a room with its walls surfaced in decorative amber. It was designed by Andreas Schlüter and its construction by the Danish amber craftsman Gottfried Wolfram started in 1701. Friedrich Wilhelm I gave the Amber Room to Tsar Peter the Great as a present in 1716.

When Friedrich I died in 1713, he was succeeded by his son, Friedrich Wilhelm I whose building plans were less ambitious, although he did ensure that the building was properly maintained. Building was resumed after his son Friedrich II (Frederick the Great) came to the throne in 1740. During that year, stables for his personal guard regiment were completed to the south of the Orangery wing and work was started on the east wing. The building of the new wing was supervised by Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff, the Superintendent of all the Royal Palaces, who largely followed Eosander's design. The decoration of the exterior was relatively simple but the interior furnishings were lavish. The ground floor was intended for Frederick's wife Elisabeth Christine, who, preferring Schönhausen Palace, was only an occasional visitor. The decoration of the upper floor, which included the White Hall, the Banqueting Hall, the Throne Room and the Golden Gallery, was lavish and was designed mainly by Johann August Nahl. In 1747, a second apartment for the king was prepared in the distant eastern part of the wing. During this time, Sanssouci was being built at Potsdam and once this was completed Frederick was only an occasional visitor to Charlottenburg.

In 1786, Frederick was succeeded by his nephew Friedrich Wilhelm II who transformed five rooms on the ground floor of the east wing into his summer quarters and part of the upper floor into Winter Chambers, although he did not live long enough to use them. His son, Friedrich Wilhelm III came to the throne in 1797 and reigned with his wife, Queen Luise for 43 years. They spent much of this time living in the east wing of Charlottenburg. Their eldest son, Friedrich Wilhelm IV, who reigned from 1840 to 1861, lived in the upper storey of the central palace building. After Friedrich Wilhelm IV died, the only other royal resident of the palace was Friedrich III who reigned for 99 days in 1888.

The palace was badly damaged in 1943 during the Second World War. In 1951, the war-damaged Stadtschloss in East Berlin was demolished and, as the damage to Charlottenburg was at least as serious, it was feared that it would also be demolished. However, following the efforts of Margarete Kühn, the Director of the State Palaces and Gardens, it was rebuilt to its former condition, with gigantic modern ceiling paintings by Hann Trier.

The garden was designed in 1697 in baroque style by Simeon Godeau who had been influenced by André Le Nôtre, designer of the gardens at Versailles. Godeau's design consisted of geometric patterns, with avenues and moats, which separated the garden from its natural surroundings. Beyond the formal gardens was the Carp Pond. Towards the end of the 18th century, a less formal, more natural-looking garden design became fashionable. In 1787 the Royal Gardener Georg Steiner redesigned the garden in the English landscape style for Friedrich Wilhelm II, the work being directed by Peter Joseph Lenné. After the Second World War, the centre of the garden was restored to its previous baroque style.