Castles in Scania

Pålsjö Castle

Pålsjö Castle was built in the late 1670s and the French style park dates from the 1760s. The first known owner was Sten Torbensen Bille, who died in 1520. The estate was destroyed in the Scanian war (1676–1679) and rebuilt soon after by Magnus Paulin, the Mayor of Helsingborg. During the Helsingborg battle in the Great Northern War (1700-1721) Earl Magnus Stenbock had his headquarters in Pålsjö ...
Founded: 1676-1679 | Location: Helsingborg, Sweden

Trollenäs Castle

Trollenäs Castle is known since the 14th century, and has been in the ownership of only two families, Thott and Trolle. Originally known as Näs Castle, it was renamed after Trolle family in the 18th century. The current building goes back to 1559 and was in the late 19th century renovated by architect Ferdinand Meldahl to resemble a French Renaissance castle. There is also a medieval church, Näs old church, near the c ...
Founded: 1559 | Location: Eslöv, Sweden

Svenstorp Castle

Svenstorp Castle was built in 1596 by Beata Hvitfeldt, a powerful lady-in-waiting to the Danish King Christian IV. Her architect was Hans Steenwinkel. In November 1676, the Danish king, Christian V, stayed at Svenstorp before the Battle of Lund. The night after the battle the Swedish king, Charles XI, whose troops had won the battle, stayed in the same room and the same bed. Since 1723, the castle has been owned by the Gy ...
Founded: 1596 | Location: Lund, Sweden

Kronovall Castle

The two-storey main building of Kronovall Castle was built originally in 1760. The present French Baroque style appearance date from the 1890s when the castle was renovated. Since 1991 Kronovall was owned by family Sparre. Today it is the office of local winery company and open by appointment.
Founded: 1760 | Location: Tomelilla, Sweden

Vittskövle Castle

Vittskövle Castle (also spelt Widtsköfle) is one of the best-preserved Renaissance castles in the Nordic countries. It has had medieval precursors, but the present castle was built by Jens Brahe in 1553. It is the largest castle in Skåne with approx. 100 rooms. Location and shape were decided out of consideration for defence and the tiled four-winged castle was built on piles in the marsh and supplied with ...
Founded: 1553 | Location: Vittskövle, Sweden

Trolleholm Castle

Trolleholm Castle (Trolleholms slott) was originally named Kattesnabbe and later Ericholm. It has been known since 1424, and was a monastic estate in the late Middle Ages. Trolleholm belonged to members of the Thott family (1533-1680) and Trolle family (1680-1806). Frederik Trolle (1693-1770) gave it its present name in 1755. The castle was reconstructed in the 1760s according the design of Carl Hårleman. The presen ...
Founded: 1760s | Location: Svalöv, Sweden

Trolle-Ljungby Castle

Trolle-Ljungby Castle, enclosed by a moat, is one of most magnificent Renaissance buildings in Sweden. In the Middle Ages it was a fortified manor house, owned by Bille family. The current castle was erected in 1629 to the grounds of the previous castle, which had been burnt down in 1525. The west wing was added in 1633 and the east wing in 1787. The stone bridge in the northern side dates from 1806. The current owner of ...
Founded: 1629 | Location: Fjälkinge, Sweden

Löberöd Castle

The early history of Löberöd estate is unknown, but the oldest parts were built in the 1620s. Then the owner was Anna Brahe. Her nephew, a member of the Ramel family, inherited Löberöd when Anne, a childless widow, passed away in 1635. The manor was in the possession of the Ramel family until 1799. The northern wing and the eight-sided turret were built in 1798-1799. About twenty years later an oranger ...
Founded: 1798-1799 | Location: Löberöd, Sweden

Snogeholm Castle

Snogeholm farm dates from the 16th century and it was owned by Thott, Brahe, Marsvin and Bille families. In the 1690s Christian Bille built the new main building between two detached wings. The current castle was built by Erik Claes Piper in 1870. The French Rococo style building has two storeys and three towers. The German Emperor Wilhelm II visited in Snogeholm in 1899 and 1902. Today Snogeholm castle hosts a hotel and ...
Founded: 1870 | Location: Sjöbo, Sweden

Tomarps Kungsgård Castle

Tomarps Kungsgård Castle was probably erected as a Renaissance building in the mid-16th century. It was composed of four, two story high wings with brick roof surrounded by a narrow square yard. The middle part of the northwing consists of the remains of a building from the Middle Ages. I the south-east corner of the yard there were a tower until the late 18th century. The castle belonged to the Brosterups linage in ...
Founded: mid-1500s | Location: Kvidinge, Sweden

Tosterup Castle

The tower of Tosterup Castle was built in the 1400s and the main building date from the 1500s. The present appearance is date mainly from the restoration made in 1760s, when the tower was merged to the main building. The castle has been owned by several famous noble families like Brahe, Thott and Krabbe. Today Tosterup is owned by family Ehrensvärd and in private use.
Founded: 15th century | Location: Tomelilla, Sweden

Hjularöd Castle

Hjularöd Castle was first mentioned in 1391, but the current castle was built in 1894-1897. It was built on command of the former owner, chamberlain Hans Gustaf Toll. French medieval castles, the château de Pierrefonds in particular, were inspiration for the castle when architects Isak Gustaf Clason and Lars Israel Wahlman designed it. Outside scenes from the television series Mysteriet på Greveholm (The ...
Founded: 1894-1897 | Location: Eslöv, Sweden

Borgeby Castle

Borgeby Castle is built on the site of an 11th-century castle or fortress. Excavations on the site may relate it to Harald Bluetooth. It may be reconstructed similar to the Trelleborg type with a diameter of 150 meters. Construction must have been in several phases with two separate ditches. The buildings on the site burned down during the Viking time. Excavations in 1998 found evidence of a mint. This is thought to proof ...
Founded: 1100s | Location: Lomma, Sweden

Maltesholm Castle

Maltesholm Castle The castle has been passed down for generations and is now the private residence of the Baron Palmstierna. The castle was originally constructed between 1635 and 1638 by the high constable of Kristianstad, Malte Juel, during the Danish rule of Scania, but the history of the estate goes back to the Middle ages and it was owned by the Brahe family. Typical for its time, the castle was a Renaissance manor b ...
Founded: 1780 | Location: Kristianstad, Sweden

Krageholm Castle

The history of Krageholm estate date from the 14th century when it was owned by family Due. Later in Middle Ages it was moved to Tott and Brahe families. In 1642 it was given to Otto Marsvin. The estate was damaged in the war with Denmark during the reign of Carl XI. In 1704 the estate was sold to Carl Piper. The present appearance was built in 1720s. The main building and two annexes are surrounded by moat and park. St. ...
Founded: 16th century | Location: Ystad, Sweden

Vrams Gunnarstorp Castle

The construction of Vrams Gunnarstorp Castle was started in 1633 by Jørgen Vind. It represents Dutch Renaissance, so-called style of King Christian IV of Denmark. 1838 the castle came to the Tornérhjelm family. It was exchanged by the Berch family for Össjö Castle and 17 barrels of gold. It is open to he public by appointment.
Founded: 1633 | Location: Bjuv, Sweden

Örtofta Castle

Örtofta manor was first mentioned in 1346 and it has been owned by several noble families. The original brick castle was built in the late 1400s and parts of it still remains. In 1857-1861 Henry Dücker enlarged and reconstructed Örtofta to the present appearance. Today the castle hosts a hotel and provides conference and wedding services.
Founded: 15th century | Location: Eslöv, Sweden

Vannaröd Castle

Vannaröd castle was completed in 1890. It was built by Christian Barnekow, who was married with Scottish Agnes Sofia Montgomery. The architecture of Vannaröd is inspired by the castle in Scotland, where Montgomery was born. Today it is a restaurant.
Founded: 1890 | Location: Sösdala, Sweden

Lindholmen Castle Ruins

Lindholmen Castle is a former Danish fortified castle on the banks of lake Börringe. It became an important fortification in the defence of Scania during the Middle Ages because of its strong encircling defensive walls and double moats. At the time, a small river and treacherous marshes made the terrain surrounding the castle hard to navigate. Originally a private castle, it was in 1339 turned over to Magnus Eriksson ...
Founded: 14th century | Location: Svedala, Sweden

Ellinge Castle

Ellinge Castle is one of Scania's oldest country seats, dating from the 13th century. The origins of the current castle building dates from the 15th century. It is still surrounded by Medieval moats. In the 18th century the Danish fortress was transformed into an open mansion of traditional Swedish style. The tower like structure was added in the middle of the 19th century. Today there are only remnants of the former for ...
Founded: 15th century | Location: Eslöv, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Porta Nigra

The Porta Nigra (Latin for black gate) is the largest Roman city gate north of the Alps. It is designated as part of the Roman Monuments, Cathedral of St. Peter and Church of Our Lady in Trier UNESCO World Heritage Site. The name Porta Nigra originated in the Middle Ages due to the darkened colour of its stone; the original Roman name has not been preserved. Locals commonly refer to the Porta Nigra simply as Porta.

The Porta Nigra was built in grey sandstone between 186 and 200 AD. The original gate consisted of two four-storied towers, projecting as near semicircles on the outer side. A narrow courtyard separated the two gate openings on either side. For unknown reasons, however, the construction of the gate remained unfinished. For example, the stones at the northern (outer) side of the gate were never abraded, and the protruding stones would have made it impossible to install movable gates. Nonetheless, the gate was used for several centuries until the end of the Roman era in Trier.

In Roman times, the Porta Nigra was part of a system of four city gates, one of which stood at each side of the roughly rectangular Roman city. The Porta Nigra guarded the northern entry to the Roman city, while the Porta Alba (White Gate) was built in the east, the Porta Media (Middle Gate) in the south, and the Porta Inclyta (Famous Gate) in the west, next to the Roman bridge across the Moselle. The gates stood at the ends of the two main streets of the Roman Trier, one of which led north-south and the other east-west. Of these gates, only the Porta Nigra still exists today.

In the early Middle Ages the Roman city gates were no longer used for their original function and their stones were taken and reused for other buildings. Also iron and lead braces were broken out of the walls of the Porta Nigra for reuse. Traces of this destruction are still clearly visible on the north side of the gate.

After 1028, the Greek monk Simeon lived as a hermit in the ruins of the Porta Nigra. After his death (1035) and sanctification, the Simeonstift monastery was built next to the Porta Nigra to honor him. Saving it from further destruction, the Porta Nigra was transformed into a church: The inner court of the gate was roofed and intermediate ceilings were inserted. The two middle storeys of the former gate were converted into church naves: the upper storey being for the monks and the lower storey for the general public. The ground floor with the large gates was sealed, and a large outside staircase was constructed alongside the south side (the town side) of the gate, up to the lower storey of the church. A small staircase led further up to the upper storey. The church rooms were accessible through former windows of the western tower of the Porta Nigra that were enlarged to become entrance doors (still visible today). The top floor of the western tower was used as church tower, the eastern tower was leveled, and an apse added at its east side. An additional gate - the much smaller Simeon Gate - was built adjacent to the East side of the Porta Nigra and served as a city gate in medieval times.

In 1802 Napoleon Bonaparte dissolved the church in the Porta Nigra and the monastery beside it, along with the vast majority of Trier"s numerous churches and monasteries. On his visit to Trier in 1804, Napoleon ordered that the Porta Nigra be converted back to its Roman form. Only the apse was kept; but the eastern tower was not rebuilt to its original height. Local legend has it that Napoleon originally wanted to completely tear down the church, but locals convinced him that the church had actually been a Gaulish festival hall before being turned into a church. Another version of the story is that they told him about its Roman origins, persuading him to convert the gate back to its original form.

In 1986 the Porta Nigra was designated a World Heritage Site, along with other Roman monuments in Trier and its surroundings. The modern appearance of the Porta Nigra goes back almost unchanged to the reconstruction ordered by Napoleon. At the south side of the Porta Nigra, remains of Roman columns line the last 100 m of the street leading to the gate. Positioned where they had stood in Roman times, they give a slight impression of the aspect of the original Roman street that was lined with colonnades. The Porta Nigra, including the upper floors, is open to visitors.