Klågerup Castle

Klågerup, Sweden

The history of Klågerup estate dates from the early 15th century, when it was owned by Peter Spoldener and his son. In the 18th century buildings were in bad shape and in 1737 Fredrik Trolle started an extensive restoration. The present main building got its appearance in 1858, when it was rebuilt to the French Renaissance style by architect Helgo Zettervall. Klågerup was a center of local peasant riots in 1811. The rebellion was defeated however in few days. Today there is a small doll museum in the wing of Klågerup castle. It is open by appointment only.

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"Sans-Culotte", Son of Döinge said 7 years ago
Peasants revolt. They don't riot. Typical bourgeois jargon. I finally saw the excellent musical 1811 by Rolf Hellmark and Lars Johansson and left flowers at the monument in June of 2011. We will always remember MÃ¥rten Bengtsson who made the supreme sacrifice.


Details

Founded: 1858
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sten Tannert (21 months ago)
Härliga promenader i välskött park och ett stort plus att de öppnat upp promenadvägar nära slottet. Fint året runt.
Annika Rosengren (2 years ago)
Fin miljö och fin väg runt Slottet
Aliona Yoga M (2 years ago)
Vackert!
Xuan Wei (2 years ago)
good nature
Pernilla Lindell (2 years ago)
Trevlig slottspark att promenera i med både blommor och bin och en liten vattenpöl med grodor och ankor. Trevlig ljudkuliss med bräkande får, råmande kossor och kvittrande fåglar. Lagom liten utflykt en lat söndag.
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