Cathedrals in United Kingdom

Cathedral of the Isles

The Cathedral of the Isles is the cathedral of the Scottish Episcopal Church in the town of Millport on the Isle of Cumbrae.  George Boyle, 6th Earl of Glasgow, was benefactor of the cathedral and the associated theological college and commissioned William Butterfield to design the building. Butterfield was one of the great architects of the Gothic revival and also designed St Ninian"s Cathedral in Perth. Constructi ...
Founded: 1849-1851 | Location: Millport, United Kingdom

Dromore Cathedral

The present Dromore Cathedral was originally constructed in 1661 by Jeremy Taylor, Bishop of Down and Connor and has been several times expanded to its present size. The first church on the site was a wattle and daub building constructed by St Colman circa 510. This was replaced by a medieval church which was destroyed in the late 16th century. The church was again rebuilt and in 1609 elevated to the 'Cathedral C ...
Founded: 1661 | Location: Dromore, United Kingdom

St Patrick's Roman Catholic Cathedral

St. Patrick"s Cathedral in Armagh, Northern Ireland is the seat of the Catholic Archbishop of Armagh, Primate of All Ireland. It was built in various phases between 1840 and 1904 to serve as the Roman Catholic Cathedral of the Archdiocese of Armagh. Although the decorative style of the cathedral was thus significantly changed in 1982, the building itself had not undergone any major structural works since the replace ...
Founded: 1840 | Location: Armagh, United Kingdom

St Eugene's Cathedral

St Eugene"s Cathedral is the Roman Catholic cathedral located in Londonderry, Northern Ireland. Fundraising for the building of the cathedral took place from 1840. Work began on the construction of the cathedral in 1849. Money was raised not just in Derry and Ireland, but also in America where around £4,000 was raised. The architect commissioned to design the cathedral was James Joseph McCarthy who had already buil ...
Founded: 1849-1903 | Location: Londonderry, United Kingdom

St Ninian's Cathedral

The Scottish Episcopal Church was disestablished in 1689 and all the Scottish cathedrals became the property of the Presbyterian Church either falling into disuse or becoming adapted for the Presbyterian rite. In 1848 two young Scottish aristocrats at Oxford University conceived the idea of reviving cathedrals for the Episcopalians and the London architect, William Butterfield was chosen to design a cathedral for Perth. ...
Founded: 1850 | Location: Perth, United Kingdom

Christ Church Cathedral

The first church was built on the site of  Christ Church Cathedral in Lisburn in the early 1600s by Sir Fulke Conway as a chapel of ease for his new castle at what was then called Lisnagarvey. It was consecrated in 1623 and dedicated to St Thomas, but was destroyed along with much of the town during the rebellion of 1641. The church was quickly rebuilt and in 1662 St Thomas"s was designated the cathedral church a ...
Founded: 1708 | Location: Lisburn, United Kingdom

Down Cathedral

Down Cathedral location is an ancient ecclesiastical site dedicated to the Holy Trinity recorded in the 12th century. In 1124 St Malachy became Bishop of Down, and set about repairing and enlarging the Cathedral. In 1177, Sir John de Courcy (Norman conqueror of Ulster) brought in Benedictine monks and expelled Augustinian monks settled there by St Malachy. De Courcy, who had enraged the king by his seizure of la ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Downpatrick, United Kingdom

Peel Cathedral

The Cathedral Church of Saint German was built in 1879–84. The Patron of the Cathedral, St German of Man, was a Celtic missionary and holy man who lived from about 410 to 474. The original cathedral of St German was inside the walls of Peel Castle and was built sometime in the 12th century when St Patrick's Isle was in the possession of Norse kings. At that time the church followed the Sarum Rite, prevalent thro ...
Founded: 1879-1884 | Location: Peel, United Kingdom

Fortrose Cathedral Ruins

Fortrose Cathedral was the episcopal seat of the medieval Scottish diocese of Ross. It is probable that the original site of the diocese was at Rosemarkie (as early as AD 700), but by the 13th century the canons had relocated a short distance to the south-west to the site known as Fortrose or Chanonry. The first recorded bishop, from around 1130, was Macbeth. According to Gervase of Canterbury, in the early 13th century t ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Fortrose, United Kingdom

Greek Orthodox Cathedral of St. Luke

Greek Orthodox Cathedral of St. Luke was designed by James Sellars and built in 1877 as the Belhaven Church for the United Presbyterian Church of Scotland. The church was built in Norman Gothic style, inspired by Dunblane Cathedral. A prominent feature of the church is the stain glass windows designed by Stephen Adam which depict scenes from the Old and New Testament. Following the amalgamation of Behaven Church with a ...
Founded: 1877 | Location: Glasgow, United Kingdom

Newry Cathedral

The See of Dromore was founded in the sixth century by Colman of Dromore, and had its own independent jurisdiction ever since. The old cathedral of Dromore, which had been taken by the Protestants, was burnt down by the Irish insurgents in 1641, and rebuilt by Bishop Taylor twenty years later; the Catholic Church was erected later. In 1750 the seat of the cathedral was transferred to Newry the largest town of County Down ...
Founded: 1825 | Location: Newry, United Kingdom

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Krickenbeck Castle

Krickenbeck moated castle is one of the oldest on the lower Rhine. Its history dates back to the year 1104, when the castle was first mentioned. It is unclear why the old castle, which was certainly inhabited by Count Reginar, was abandoned or destroyed. In the mid-13th century the castle was moved to the current location. At the end of the 14th century the new castle belonged to the Counts of Kleve.

Johann Friedrich II of Schesaberg converted the castle into a Baroque mansion between 1708-1721. On September 7, 1902, a fire destroyed the entire mansion. From 1903 to 1904, a three-winged castle was built in the Neo-Renaissance style. Today Krickenbeck is a conference center.