St Ninian's Cathedral

Perth, United Kingdom

The Scottish Episcopal Church was disestablished in 1689 and all the Scottish cathedrals became the property of the Presbyterian Church either falling into disuse or becoming adapted for the Presbyterian rite. In 1848 two young Scottish aristocrats at Oxford University conceived the idea of reviving cathedrals for the Episcopalians and the London architect, William Butterfield was chosen to design a cathedral for Perth. £5751 was raised by subscription. This was enough to build the chancel and one bay of the nave and the north wall to its full eventual length to be consecrated on December 10th 1850.

In 1900 alterations and additions were started including a design for the Chapter House and Lady Chapel completed in 1908 with an east window by the Whitefriars Glass Co. Following his death in 1907 Wilkinson was commemorated with a statue by Sir George Frampton in bronze. Further additions to the cloisters were added by Tarbolton & Ochterlony in 1936.

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Founded: 1850
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alyson Lehninger (13 months ago)
A beautiful cathedral. A very helpful lady gave us lots of information, which was much appreciated.
Alyson Lehninger (13 months ago)
A beautiful cathedral. A very helpful lady gave us lots of information, which was much appreciated.
elaine Scott (2 years ago)
This place is awesome and loads to do and plenty for the kids to enjoy and Dress up and take pictures when they Dress up
elaine Scott (2 years ago)
This place is awesome and loads to do and plenty for the kids to enjoy and Dress up and take pictures when they Dress up
Amanda Wright (2 years ago)
Fabulous Neo Gothic building designed by Butterfield. Lovely prayerful atmosphere in the midst of the bustle. Good access throughout, warm welcome and excellent worship.
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