The present Dromore Cathedral was originally constructed in 1661 by Jeremy Taylor, Bishop of Down and Connor and has been several times expanded to its present size.

The first church on the site was a wattle and daub building constructed by St Colman circa 510. This was replaced by a medieval church which was destroyed in the late 16th century. The church was again rebuilt and in 1609 elevated to the 'Cathedral Church of Christ the Redeemer' by Letters Patent of James I. In 1641 this building, too, was destroyed.

The present building was first constructed under Bishop Jeremy Taylor in 1661 as a narrow church 100 feet (30 metres) long. In 1811 Thomas Percy (bishop of Dromore) added a short aisle at right angles to the nave to form an L-shaped floor plan. In 1870 a semicircular sanctuary and organ aisle were added. Finally in 1899 an additional aisle parallel to the original nave aisle was added to achieve a conventional rectangular floor plan.

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Founded: 1661
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Alan Turkington (4 months ago)
Love this church, so welcoming and lovely traditional service and hymns. Would highly recommend a visit (or more).
Derek Hynds (6 months ago)
Great church. Excellent Minister. Relaxed atmosphere. Always a pleasure to meet there ?
Ciaran Mathers (17 months ago)
Just lovely.
Deborah Neill (2 years ago)
Lovely old church, beautiful sermon.
Kenny Martin (2 years ago)
We attend every sunday and always come away feeling inspired and ready to face the week ahead, love worshiping with our church family.
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