The present Dromore Cathedral was originally constructed in 1661 by Jeremy Taylor, Bishop of Down and Connor and has been several times expanded to its present size.

The first church on the site was a wattle and daub building constructed by St Colman circa 510. This was replaced by a medieval church which was destroyed in the late 16th century. The church was again rebuilt and in 1609 elevated to the 'Cathedral Church of Christ the Redeemer' by Letters Patent of James I. In 1641 this building, too, was destroyed.

The present building was first constructed under Bishop Jeremy Taylor in 1661 as a narrow church 100 feet (30 metres) long. In 1811 Thomas Percy (bishop of Dromore) added a short aisle at right angles to the nave to form an L-shaped floor plan. In 1870 a semicircular sanctuary and organ aisle were added. Finally in 1899 an additional aisle parallel to the original nave aisle was added to achieve a conventional rectangular floor plan.

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Founded: 1661
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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Paul Stevenson (18 months ago)
Old cathedral by the river lagan on the site of an ancient monastic settlement connected with St Colman 514 AD. The Cathedral itself looks more like a stone church in stature. Theres a repaired high cross which used to be in the market square. The present cathedral was Built in 1661 but has been expanded through the years.
Hilda Meeke (18 months ago)
Ryan Fox (20 months ago)
Robert Smyth (2 years ago)
Lovely old church
Fee Garrett (3 years ago)
Very welcoming to non parishioners
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