The See of Dromore was founded in the sixth century by Colman of Dromore, and had its own independent jurisdiction ever since. The old cathedral of Dromore, which had been taken by the Protestants, was burnt down by the Irish insurgents in 1641, and rebuilt by Bishop Taylor twenty years later; the Catholic Church was erected later. In 1750 the seat of the cathedral was transferred to Newry the largest town of County Down situated at the head of Carlingford Lough.

Newry Cathedral, dedicated under the joint patronage of St Patrick & St Colman, was designed by the city's greatest native architect Thomas Duff and work began in 1825 with the basic building completed in 1829. Built of local granite, it was the first Catholic Cathedral in Ireland opened after Catholic Emancipation.

Work continued to enlarge and beautify the Cathedral at various stages in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century viz. the tower and transept were added in 1888 and the nave extended in 1904 under the supervision of Bishop Henry O'Neill.

The Cathedral replaced St Mary’s Church (the Old Chapel) which has been constructed by Bishop Lennon in 1789 and which, for forty years, doubled as both a parish Church and quasi-cathedral, two bishops having received episcopal consecration there.

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Founded: 1825
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Peter Bates (18 months ago)
This is a very beautiful and lovely old-world Cathedral. More than that, it is a loving Church building because it functions as an irdinary Parish Church in the heart of a modern town. It's beauty never fails to move me. During the summer seaon, tours of the Cathedral are available locally from the Cathedral's office / internet.
Conlin Doyle (18 months ago)
A beautiful example of gothic architecture, Stunning mosaic floors.
PaulAnthony (18 months ago)
Best Church ever everyone is nice and nice songs
Mary McGovern (19 months ago)
Love the Cathederal, I'm from a neighbouring parish but always try to make the journey each Sunday to Holy Mass here. Love how the blessed sacrament is displayed on the altar before and after mass. I
Christine Mccartan (19 months ago)
Seating is very cramped. Lacking in legroom yet such superb architecture and peaceful place to pray.
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