The See of Dromore was founded in the sixth century by Colman of Dromore, and had its own independent jurisdiction ever since. The old cathedral of Dromore, which had been taken by the Protestants, was burnt down by the Irish insurgents in 1641, and rebuilt by Bishop Taylor twenty years later; the Catholic Church was erected later. In 1750 the seat of the cathedral was transferred to Newry the largest town of County Down situated at the head of Carlingford Lough.

Newry Cathedral, dedicated under the joint patronage of St Patrick & St Colman, was designed by the city's greatest native architect Thomas Duff and work began in 1825 with the basic building completed in 1829. Built of local granite, it was the first Catholic Cathedral in Ireland opened after Catholic Emancipation.

Work continued to enlarge and beautify the Cathedral at various stages in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century viz. the tower and transept were added in 1888 and the nave extended in 1904 under the supervision of Bishop Henry O'Neill.

The Cathedral replaced St Mary’s Church (the Old Chapel) which has been constructed by Bishop Lennon in 1789 and which, for forty years, doubled as both a parish Church and quasi-cathedral, two bishops having received episcopal consecration there.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1825
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Felipe Cunha (9 months ago)
Beautiful church, very inspiring place. It would be great to see a latin mass in such beautiful altar
Cantoiri church choir (11 months ago)
Beautiful place to pray
Mabel Chah official (2 years ago)
I did not get in but I will next time. It looks beautiful.
Matt “Matt Woods” Woods (2 years ago)
A beautiful building with amazing architecture and fine artifacts.
Nina D (2 years ago)
Beautiful building inside and out. Worth visiting even if you are belong to different faith.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Late Baroque Town of Ragusa

The eight towns in south-eastern Sicily, including Ragusa, were all rebuilt after 1693 on or beside towns existing at the time of the earthquake which took place in that year. They represent a considerable collective undertaking, successfully carried out at a high level of architectural and artistic achievement. Keeping within the late Baroque style of the day, they also depict distinctive innovations in town planning and urban building. Together with seven other cities in the Val di Noto, it is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

In 1693 Ragusa was devastated by a huge earthquake, which killed some 5,000 inhabitants. Following this catastrophe the city was largely rebuilt, and many Baroque buildings from this time remain in the city. Most of the population moved to a new settlement in the former district of Patro, calling this new municipality 'Ragusa Superiore' (Upper Ragusa) and the ancient city 'Ragusa Inferiore' (Lower Ragusa). The two cities remained separated until 1926, when they were fused together to become a provincial capital in 1927.