The Cathedral Church of Saint German was built in 1879–84. The Patron of the Cathedral, St German of Man, was a Celtic missionary and holy man who lived from about 410 to 474.

The original cathedral of St German was inside the walls of Peel Castle and was built sometime in the 12th century when St Patrick's Isle was in the possession of Norse kings. At that time the church followed the Sarum Rite, prevalent throughout much of the British Isles. Around 1333 the Lords of Man refortified St Patrick’s Island and occupied the church as a fortress. In 1392 William Le Scroop repaired the Cathedral.

The building fell into ruin in the 18th century. After a considerable period of debate over who owned the ruins and site, it was decided not to rebuild that cathedral. The present building was constructed in 1879–84 to replace St Peter's Church in Peel's market place. In 1895, the bishop consecrated his chapel at the bishop's palace as pro-cathedral and instituted a chapter of canons with himself as Dean. That arrangement (bishop as dean) persisted even after the consecration of the new cathedral.

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Details

Founded: 1879-1884
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrew Showler (9 months ago)
Nice to see such a lovely church open to the public. Food parcels available inside for those in need. Tea or coffee and cake sitting on the counter for anyone needing refreshments. Such a warm bright space. Welcome on a cold windy day.
John Hamshare (10 months ago)
A lovely welcome from a man who told us all about the treasures and history of the cathedral.
Ravina Talbot (10 months ago)
Perfect visit to hidden treasures of the Isle of Man. Don't forget to see the menorah which is unique and built from rockets fired on Gaza strip
Francis Reed (2 years ago)
Brilliant millennium garden surrounding Peel Cathedral, illustrating the history of Christianity on the Island since the 6th century until today, including contemporary science, health, art & play.
Henry Uniacke (2 years ago)
There is a foodbank for anyone in need, and warm blankets at the back of the Cathedral. Help yourself to tea and coffee at the tea bar. Enjoy the space, the light, the exhibitions. In warmer weather the gardens (under loving construction) are a haven of plants and wildlife. You can walk the labyrinth or spend some moments in the small Keeill (chapel).
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