Chateaux of Normandy

Château de Couterne

Château de Couterne was originally built by Jehan de Frotté, who acquired the estate in 1542. The granite and red-brick castle has been rebuilt several stages between the 16th and 18th centuries and it has been owned by Frotté family all the time. Today it is open to the public in summer season.
Founded: 16th century | Location: Couterne, France

Château de la Fresnaye

Château de la Fresnaye was built in the 17th century. The estate was acquired in 1640 by Nicolas Vauquelin and three manor buildings were mentioned in document dated to 1678. The main building was rebuilt in 1750. The beautiful English style park surrounds the castle.
Founded: 17th century | Location: Falaise, France

Château de Bonneville

In the 15th century, the site of château belonged to the family Bonneville. Jean Bonneville, king"s chamberlain, was quoted in 1400 as lord of Chamblac and Bonneville. The castle was a property of this family until the 18th century. The mansion is a square brick house, fully renovated during the Louis XV era with mansard roofs. In the 19th century Château de Bonneville was a residence of writer Jean de La ...
Founded: 14th century | Location: Chamblac, France

Château de Houlbec

Château de Houlbec-près-le-Gros-Theil was originally a square castle with rounded corner towers. It was built in the Middle Ages and conquered by English in 1418 (Hundred Years' War) and by Catholic League in 1588 (during the Wars of Religion). The castle was rebuilt in 1786 and heavily damaged by fire in 1910. Today the château is abandoned but two towers and other signicant ruins still remain.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Houlbec-prés-le-Gros-Theil, France

Château de Bonneville-sur-Touques

Château de Bonneville-sur-Touques was mentioned already in the 11th century, but the castle was probably built in the 13th century (the biggest tower is however mentioned already in the late 1100s).
Founded: 13th century | Location: Bonneville-sur-Touques, France

Manoir du Catel

Manoir du Catel was built between 1267-1270 by Richard Treigots, the abbot of Fécamp Abbey. It is one of the oldest and best-preserved Norman style fortified manor houses. It consists of towers in four corners, fortified gatehouse and moat.
Founded: 1267-1270 | Location: Écretteville-lès-Baons, France

Château d'Yville

With its magnificent park and gardens, the 18th-century Château d"Yville and its domain are privately owned, and usually closed to the public. It was built in 1723-1735 to the site of 15th century mansion, which was destroyed in 1708.
Founded: 1723-1735 | Location: Yville-sur-Seine, France

Château de Courcy

The Château de Courcy was mentioned in 1091, when it was owned by Richard de Courcy and besieged by Robert Curthose. At the start of the 17th century, the castle was demolished by order of Richelieu and, losing all military function, slowly became an agricultural enterprise. In 1975, the remaining parts of the former castle including the gate on the road from Tôtes and the gateway to the second enceinte were p ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Courcy, France

Château d'Olivet Ruins

Château d"Olivet was an motte-and-bailey castle in the Grimbosq forest. It was built in the 11th century by Erneis Taisson. The castle was demolished probably in the 17th century. The excavation and restoration of ruins was made in the 1970s.
Founded: 11th century | Location: Saint-Laurent-de-Condel, France

Château d'Orcher

Château d"Orcher was built to protect the mouth of the River Seine. The square keep was surrounded by a trapezoidal enceinte, defended in the 13th century by three square towers. In 1360 it was partly destroyed on the orders of officials from Harfleur. Rebuilt later, it was taken by the English in 1415 at the same time as Harfleur. Thomas Planterose took possession of Château d"Orcher in 1735 and o ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Gonfreville-l'Orcher, France

Château du Bosc Théroulde

In 1598, Jacques Le Faë, Adviser to the King, acquired the property from the Cormeilles Family and built the present Château du Bosc Théroulde. Built in Louis XIII style of bricks, construction started in 1616 was completed in 1632. He married Anne Petit, then died in 1630, and the estate is ruled by his wife on behalf of her nobles children until 1637. Adrien Le Faë inherited the estate and was mad ...
Founded: 1616-1632 | Location: Bosc-Guérard-Saint-Adrien, France

Château d'Ailly

Château d'Ailly was first mentioned in 1050 when Robert d'Ailly built a manor surrounded with walls, moat and mill. The near St. Gerbold's Church was also built then. In 1431 english King Henry VI gave the land property of Ailly to his uncle. Back in French possession, the manor belonged to the Courseulles and De Saint Laurens families until it was acquired by d'Aubert de Caudémone in the 17th century. Charle ...
Founded: 1050 | Location: Bernières-d'Ailly, France

Château de La Pommeraye

The history of Château de La Pommeraye originates from the 11th century. The moat and walls date from the original castle. The castle was rebuilt in 1646 and again in 1850. There is also a 19th century orangerie, chapel and gardens. Today Château de La Pommeraye is a hotel.
Founded: 1646 | Location: La Pommeraye, France

Château de Tournebu

Château de Tournebu was originally built by the Tournebu family in the 12th and 13th centuries. In the early 17th century it was modified and enlarged with four bastions. The castle was destroyed during the Revolution. Today donjon, a keep, remains.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Tournebu, France

Château de Versainville

The construction of Château de Versainville was started in 1715 by François-Joseph de Marguerit. It was completed until 1730. The castle renewed and modified in the early 20th century. Today Versainville is used for weddings or seasonal rentals.
Founded: 1715 | Location: Versainville, France

Château d'Amfreville

Château d"Amfreville was originally established in the late 1100s by Richard de Reviers. It was a enclosed castle with a moat. The main building was rebuilt as a manor house in the 17th century and most of the annex buildings in the 18th century. The gate tower from the 14th century still exists.
Founded: 15th century | Location: Amfreville, France

Manoir de Coutainville

The Manoir de Coutainville is a fortified manor house built during 15th and 17th centuries that was a fiefdom of Jean de Costentin. It is listed in the French Supplementary Inventory of Historic Monuments. Today it is a hotel.
Founded: 15th century | Location: Agon-Coutainville, France

Château de Gavray Ruins

Château de Gavray was the castle of local Dukes, built in the 11th century. It was first time mentioned in 1091 and in 1123 some enhancements (probably a tower) was done. The castle was besieged and conquered in the Hundred Years War". In the 17th century it was lost is purpose and demolished. Today ruins remain on the site.
Founded: 11th century | Location: Gavray, France

Château de Plain-Marais

Château de Plain-Marais was built to the hill surrounded by marsh land in the 14th century. In the 15th century it was owned by Jean d"Arclais and later by Jean de Talbot. It was originally a square stone castle surrounded by a moat. Current main building, annexes and tower were built in the 15th and 16th centuries and the major restoration was made in the 17th century.
Founded: 14th century | Location: Beuzeville-la-Bastille, France

Château du Tourps

The history of Château du Tourps dates to the mid-1100s. It was burnt down by English Army in 1346 and besieged during the Wars or Religion in 1591. Since the late 1600s the château lied in ruins. The current private mansion dates from the 18th century.
Founded: 18th century | Location: Anneville-en-Saire, France

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Church of Our Lady before Týn

The Church of Our Lady before Týn is a dominant feature of the Old Town of Prague and has been the main church of this part of the city since the 14th century. The church's towers are 80 m high and topped by four small spires.

In the 11th century, this area was occupied by a Romanesque church, which was built there for foreign merchants coming to the nearby Týn Courtyard. Later it was replaced by an early Gothic Church of Our Lady before Týn in 1256. Construction of the present church began in the 14th century in the late Gothic style under the influence of Matthias of Arras and later Peter Parler. By the beginning of the 15th century, construction was almost complete; only the towers, the gable and roof were missing. The church was controlled by Hussites for two centuries, including John of Rokycan, future archbishop of Prague, who became the church's vicar in 1427. The roof was completed in the 1450s, while the gable and northern tower were completed shortly thereafter during the reign of George of Poděbrady (1453–1471). His sculpture was placed on the gable, below a huge golden chalice, the symbol of the Hussites. The southern tower was not completed until 1511, under architect Matěj Rejsek.

After the lost Battle of White Mountain (1620) began the era of harsh recatholicisation (part of the Counter-Reformation). Consequently, the sculptures of 'heretic king' George of Poděbrady and the chalice were removed in 1626 and replaced by a sculpture of the Virgin Mary, with a giant halo made from by melting down the chalice. In 1679 the church was struck by lightning, and the subsequent fire heavily damaged the old vault, which was later replaced by a lower baroque vault.

Renovation works carried out in 1876–1895 were later reversed during extensive exterior renovation works in the years 1973–1995. Interior renovation is still in progress.

The northern portal is a wonderful example of Gothic sculpture from the Parler workshop, with a relief depicting the Crucifixion. The main entrance is located on the church's western face, through a narrow passage between the houses in front of the church.

The early baroque altarpiece has paintings by Karel Škréta from around 1649. The oldest pipe organ in Prague stands inside this church. The organ was built in 1673 by Heinrich Mundt and is one of the most representative 17th-century organs in Europe.