Chateaux of Normandy

Château des Ducs

Château des Ducs (Castle of Dukes) was a former house of Dukes of Normandy. It was burnt down in the Hundred Years" War and rebuilt soon after in the 14th century. Since 1827 it has been a courthouse.
Founded: 14th century | Location: Argentan, France

Château de Médavy

Château de Médavy is a beautiful 18th century castle with classical architecture inspired in particular by Mansart (Versailles’ architect). Current main building was erected between 1705 and 1724 for Jacques-Léonor Rouxel de Médavy, marshal of France. The entirety was refurbished between 1754 and 1789 by Pierre Thiroux de Monregard, superintendent of the French relays and postal service. ...
Founded: 1705-1724 | Location: Médavy, France

Château de la Motte

The history of Château de la Motte began as a Viking motte and bailey fortress and evolved into the 18th and 19th century Château seen today. The two most noted families who owned the site were the Gabriel Montgommerys and the Nicolas Angos, but its role as Resistance center in World War II may be its most notable episode. Long established Norman châteaux, like Château de la Motte, usually origina ...
Founded: c. 1700 | Location: Joué-du-Plain, France

Château de Regnéville

Château de Regnéville is a ruined castle, intended to protect the important dry harbour of Regnéville-sur-Mer. The fortress was founded in the 12th century and the major remains date from the 14th century. It was then composed of an upper courtyard in the east, whose foundations were partially revealed at the time of the excavations carried out in 1991 to 1993. The large tower, of which there remain on ...
Founded: 14th century | Location: Regnéville-sur-Mer, France

Château de Martinvast

Château de Martinvast was built in three different centuries: 11th, 16th and 19th centuries. The first castle was ruined in the Hundred Years" War and rebuilt between 1579 and 1581 by Bertholde du Moncel, with a wingframed by two large, square protucing fortified lodges. Of the medieval construction which remained, he only retained the keep. It was at that time surrrounded by moats and marshland. From 1820 to 1 ...
Founded: 11th century | Location: Martinvast, France

Château Ganne Ruins

Château Ganne was an ancient castle built in the 11th and 12th centuries by La Pommeraye family. The big storm on the December 1999 destroyed the the castle ruins and today only basement and some walls remain.
Founded: 11th century | Location: Cossesseville, France

Fontaine Saint-Denis Ruins

Fontaine Saint-Denis was a former castle of the count of Evreux, of which the walls have been restored. The first wooden castle was burnt down in 1024. The new stone castle was also destroyed by fire in the 15th century. Medieval tower with viewpoint dominating the Seine Valley and pathway around walls with drawbridge. Inside the walls, remnants of wood store and old chapel. At the foot of the site, an old wash house has ...
Founded: 11th century | Location: Notre-Dame-de-Gravenchon, France

Château de Querqueville

The construction of Château de Querqueville was probably built in 1730 by Barbou family. Napoleon I visited in the castle in 1811. In 1938 it was acquired by the Querqueville community as a town hall.
Founded: 1730 | Location: Querqueville, France

Château de Brécourt

Château de Brécourt was built in 1625. It consists of a moat and U-shaped main building. Today it is a hotel.
Founded: 1625 | Location: Douains, France

Château de la Madeleine

Château de la Madeleine was originally built in 1129 by St. Adjutor (the patron saint of the river sailors, who died in 1131) and it was dedicated to Mary Magdalene. There is only one wall left to the west of the property. In 1407 a monk named Jean le Vigneron probably built a new castle and priory to the same site. The priory called 'priory of La Madeleine' remained church property until 1789, when it was confiscated. T ...
Founded: 1129 | Location: Pressagny-l'Orgueilleux, France

Manoir d'Auffay

There has been a feodal castle near the current Manoir d'Auffay since 11th century. Today a some stone fragments remain of this castle. The current castle was built in the early 1500s by Jacques D'Holbach and his nephew Antoine. The square-form building has rounded towers in corners.
Founded: 16th century | Location: Oherville, France

Château de la Rivière-Bourdet

The first castle in Quevillon was built by Étienne Bourdet in the 13th century and it was demolished in 1570. The current castle dates from the 1620s and it was built by Charles II Maignart de Bernières. Voltaire stayed in the castle in 1723. Today Château de la Rivière-Bourdet is in private use.
Founded: 1620s | Location: Quevillon, France

Château de Beaumont-le-Richard

Château de Beaumont-le-Richard is named after Richard du Hommet (1115-1180), who built the castle. With the decline of the seigniory, the castle was replaced by a farm, which functioned up until World War II. Today everything but the chapel is in ruins. The private chapel was dedicated in 1640 and other farm buildings were built in the 17th and 18th centuries. The castle and the surrounding terrain is private prope ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Englesqueville-la-Percée, France

Château de Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte

Château de Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte was built in the 11th and 12th centuries. It was besieged twice during the Hundred Years War. The city walls were breached by cannon in 1374. This is believed to have been among the first successful uses of guns against city walls in history. Today it is partially ruined, but still a notable castle with massive 14th century towers and a 12-15th century abbey.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte, France

Château de Tancarville

Château de Tancarville was built in the 11th century by Raoul, the chamberlain of Dukes of Normandy. In the 12th century the square tower was built with 1.65m thick walls. In 1418 at the time of the conquest of Normandy by Henry V of England, the title of Earl of Tancarville was given to John Grey. After the Hundred Years War the Harcourt family restored the castle. The ballroom was built in 1468. In 1709 the castle ...
Founded: 11th century | Location: Tancarville, France

Château de Tilly

Château de Tilly was built by Claude Le Roux, the adviser of Parlement de Normandie, between 1530-1535. The castle is a small Renaissance jewel with its turrets with pointed roofs and red brick façades decorated with diamond shapes and lattices.
Founded: 1530-1535 | Location: Boissey-le-Châtel, France

Château de Colombières

Château de Colombières dates back to the 11th century. It was a fortress occupied by William, Raoul and Baudouin of Colombières, comrades in arms of William the Conqueror during the invasion of England in 1066. However the oldest parts of the present castle date back to the end of the 14th century. The wealthy Bacon du Molay built the fortress with the defensive architecture: a quadrangle flanked by fo ...
Founded: c. 1372 | Location: Colombières, France

Chateau de Guernon-Ranville

he actual date of construction of the Château de Guernon-Ranville is not known. However, taking into account the architectural style of the château and notably the harmony of its façade, the château was built in the 18th century. Its name comes from the family who acquired the fief of Ranville in 1751 and who then added Ranville to their patronymic name, the result of which is Guernon-Ranville . T ...
Founded: 18th century | Location: Ranville, France

Château de Saint-Just

The Château de Saint-Just is a Renaissance castle with a one of the most the remarkable gardens of France. The first chateau was built in the 13th century, but only a few foundations remain. Near the end of the 16th century, Jacques de Croixmare built a new residence on the site. A record of the property in the fief of Saint-Just, written in 1608, mentions a manor, common buildings, an orangerie, a garden and a kitchen g ...
Founded: 1608 | Location: Saint-Just, France

Château de Crosville

The history of Crosville family dates from the Norman Age (11th century), but the Château de Crosville was built in the late 1400s by Jean Boudet Crosville. Today the keep and gatehouse remain of this castle. In the 18th century Jean V Crosville rebuilt the castle, but it was left to decay in 1742. Put up for sale in 1980, the Lefol family, then farmers, bought up the entire property. Today, thanks to their eager f ...
Founded: 15th century | Location: Crosville-sur-Douve, France

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Church of the Savior on Blood

The Church of the Savior on Spilled Blood is one of the main sights of St. Petersburg. The church was built on the site where Tsar Alexander II was assassinated and was dedicated in his memory. Construction began in 1883 under Alexander III, as a memorial to his father, Alexander II. Work progressed slowly and was finally completed during the reign of Nicholas II in 1907. Funding was provided by the Imperial family with the support of many private donors.

Architecturally, the Cathedral differs from St. Petersburg's other structures. The city's architecture is predominantly Baroque and Neoclassical, but the Savior on Blood harks back to medieval Russian architecture in the spirit of romantic nationalism. It intentionally resembles the 17th-century Yaroslavl churches and the celebrated St. Basil's Cathedral in Moscow.

The Church contains over 7500 square metres of mosaics — according to its restorers, more than any other church in the world. The interior was designed by some of the most celebrated Russian artists of the day — including Viktor Vasnetsov, Mikhail Nesterov and Mikhail Vrubel — but the church's chief architect, Alfred Alexandrovich Parland, was relatively little-known (born in St. Petersburg in 1842 in a Baltic-German Lutheran family). Perhaps not surprisingly, the Church's construction ran well over budget, having been estimated at 3.6 million roubles but ending up costing over 4.6 million. The walls and ceilings inside the Church are completely covered in intricately detailed mosaics — the main pictures being biblical scenes or figures — but with very fine patterned borders setting off each picture.

In the aftermath of the Russian Revolution, the church was ransacked and looted, badly damaging its interior. The Soviet government closed the church in the early 1930s. During the Second World War when many people were starving due to the Siege of Leningrad by Nazi German military forces, the church was used as a temporary morgue for those who died in combat and from starvation and illness. The church suffered significant damage. After the war, it was used as a warehouse for vegetables, leading to the sardonic name of Saviour on Potatoes.

In July 1970, management of the Church passed to Saint Isaac's Cathedral (then used as a highly profitable museum) and proceeds from the Cathedral were funneled back into restoring the Church. It was reopened in August 1997, after 27 years of restoration, but has not been reconsecrated and does not function as a full-time place of worship; it is a Museum of Mosaics. Even before the Revolution it never functioned as a public place of worship; having been dedicated exclusively to the memory of the assassinated tsar, the only services were panikhidas (memorial services). The Church is now one of the main tourist attractions in St. Petersburg.