Chateaux of Normandy

Château de Vascoeuil

Château de Vascoeuil is a beautiful 15th century castle with a museum and sculpture park in the gardens. A noble house built after the Hundred Years War, the château hosts the museum of Jules Michelet, dedicated to the famous French historian, in one of its outbuildings. Wander around the grounds of the estate, through the typically French gardens, to uncover the sculptures that have been placed amongst the be ...
Founded: 15th century | Location: Vascœuil, France

Château du Bosc Théroulde

In 1598, Jacques Le Faë, Adviser to the King, acquired the property from the Cormeilles Family and built the present Château du Bosc Théroulde. Built in Louis XIII style of bricks, construction started in 1616 was completed in 1632. He married Anne Petit, then died in 1630, and the estate is ruled by his wife on behalf of her nobles children until 1637. Adrien Le Faë inherited the estate and was mad ...
Founded: 1616-1632 | Location: Bosc-Guérard-Saint-Adrien, France

Château de Beaumont-le-Richard

Château de Beaumont-le-Richard is named after Richard du Hommet (1115-1180), who built the castle. With the decline of the seigniory, the castle was replaced by a farm, which functioned up until World War II. Today everything but the chapel is in ruins. The private chapel was dedicated in 1640 and other farm buildings were built in the 17th and 18th centuries. The castle and the surrounding terrain is private prope ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Englesqueville-la-Percée, France

Château de Brécourt

Château de Brécourt was built in 1625. It consists of a moat and U-shaped main building. Today it is a hotel.
Founded: 1625 | Location: Douains, France

Château de Gavray Ruins

Château de Gavray was the castle of local Dukes, built in the 11th century. It was first time mentioned in 1091 and in 1123 some enhancements (probably a tower) was done. The castle was besieged and conquered in the Hundred Years War". In the 17th century it was lost is purpose and demolished. Today ruins remain on the site.
Founded: 11th century | Location: Gavray, France

Château de Filières

In 1467 Jehan de Fillières bought the current Château de Filières estate and built a new building to the site of castle destroyed in Hundred Years" War. This was burnt down in 1591 during the Wars of Religion. The next castle was built in Henry IV style around 1599. Louise-Catherine Chardon de Filières rebuilt the castle again in 1767-1768.
Founded: 1599-1768 | Location: Gommerville, France

Manoir du Catel

Manoir du Catel was built between 1267-1270 by Richard Treigots, the abbot of Fécamp Abbey. It is one of the oldest and best-preserved Norman style fortified manor houses. It consists of towers in four corners, fortified gatehouse and moat.
Founded: 1267-1270 | Location: Écretteville-lès-Baons, France

Château de Vimer

Château de Vimer was built in the early 1700s by Nollet de Malvoüe. It consists of main building and park built in 1840. During the Invasion of Normandy in 1944 the château was a field hospital.
Founded: 18th century | Location: Guerquesalles, France

Château Ganne Ruins

Château Ganne was an ancient castle built in the 11th and 12th centuries by La Pommeraye family. The big storm on the December 1999 destroyed the the castle ruins and today only basement and some walls remain.
Founded: 11th century | Location: Cossesseville, France

Château du Vaudroc

Château du Vaudroc was built to the site of Benedictine Priory from 1746. The park is open to the public couple of times annually.
Founded: 1746 | Location: Limpiville, France

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Castle Rushen

Castle Rushen is located in the Isle of Man"s historic capital, Castletown. The castle is amongst the best examples of medieval castles in the British Isles, and is still in use as a court house, museum and educational centre.

The exact date of castle is unknown, although construction is thought to have taken place during the reigns of the late 12th century and early 13th century rulers of the Isle of Man – the Kings of Mann and the Isles. The original Castle Rushen consisted of a central square stone tower, or keep. The site was also fortified to guard the entrance to the Silver Burn. From its early beginnings, the castle was continually developed by successive rulers of Mann between the 13th and 16th century. The limestone walls dominated much of the surrounding landscape, serving as a point of dominance for the various rulers of the Isle of Man. By 1313, the original keep had been reinforced with towers to the west and south. In the 14th century, an east tower, gatehouses, and curtain wall were added.

After several more changes of hands the English and their supporters eventually prevailed. The English king Edward I Longshanks claimed that the island had belonged to the Kings of England for generations and he was merely reasserting their rightful claim to the Isle of Man.

The 18th century saw the castle in steady decay. By the end of the century it was converted into a prison. Even though the castle was in continuous use as a prison, the decline continued until the turn of the 20th century, when it was restored under the oversight of the Lieutenant Governor, George Somerset, 3rd Baron Raglan. Following the restoration work, and the completion of the purpose-built Victoria Road Prison in 1891, the castle was transferred from the British Crown to the Isle of Man Government in 1929.

Today it is run as a museum by Manx National Heritage, depicting the history of the Kings and Lords of Mann. Most rooms are open to the public during the opening season (March to October), and all open rooms have signs telling their stories. The exhibitions include a working medieval kitchen where authentic period food is prepared on special occasions and re-enactments of various aspects of medieval life are held on a regular basis, with particular emphasis on educating the local children about their history. Archaeological finds made during excavations in the 1980s are displayed and used as learning tools for visitors.