Chateaux of Normandy

Château du Repas

The current Château du Repas was built to the site of older castle in the early 17th century, probably between 1605-1615. The U-shaped building was surrounded by a moat.
Founded: 1605-1615 | Location: Chênedouit, France

Château de Vimer

Château de Vimer was built in the early 1700s by Nollet de Malvoüe. It consists of main building and park built in 1840. During the Invasion of Normandy in 1944 the château was a field hospital.
Founded: 18th century | Location: Guerquesalles, France

Château d'Ailly

Château d'Ailly was first mentioned in 1050 when Robert d'Ailly built a manor surrounded with walls, moat and mill. The near St. Gerbold's Church was also built then. In 1431 english King Henry VI gave the land property of Ailly to his uncle. Back in French possession, the manor belonged to the Courseulles and De Saint Laurens families until it was acquired by d'Aubert de Caudémone in the 17th century. Charle ...
Founded: 1050 | Location: Bernières-d'Ailly, France

Château de Montaure

Château de Montaure was built in the early 1700s to the site of feudal castle from the 9th century. The current castle represents the Louis XV style. There are occasional events in the castle area.
Founded: 18th century | Location: Montaure, France

Château du Plessis-Bouquelon

Château du Plessis-Bouquelon was built first in the 16th century and enlarged during the 18th and 19th centuries. The oldest mention of the castle dates from 1464. The chapel was built in 1844.
Founded: 16th century | Location: Saint-Mards-de-Blacarville, France

Château du Buisson de May

In the Middle ages, the land of today Château du Buisson de May belonged probably to the family de May. The oldest written document dates back to XVth century, when Jean de Brucourt, responsible for the famous Chatelet of Paris, sold the estate of Osmoy Michel de Bordeaux. The family de Bordeaux kept the Buisson de May over the centuries, selling wood, letting out land, farm and houses, as they were aldermen in Vern ...
Founded: 1781-1783 | Location: Saint-Aquilin-de-Pacy, France

Château de Saint-Gervais

The first record of Château de Saint-Gervais dates back to the year 1198. In 1651 Jean de Carrey, Advisor to the King in his finance chamber, acquires the titles of Lord of Saint Gervais. The destruction of the original chateau occured at the time of the Revolution (1794). In 1837 the land and property at Saint Gervais was acquired by Michel Pierre Alexis Hebert, barrister in the High Court subsequent Garde des Scea ...
Founded: 1840 | Location: Asnières, France

Château de Bailleul

Château de Bailleul was built by Bertrand de Bailleul, powerful nobleman, who acquired the land in 1534. The castle was probably completed between 1550-1560. It was strongly modified in the late 1700s and the major restoration was made in 1870-1890. It has never been sold and is still in possession of Bailleul family.
Founded: 1543-1560 | Location: Angerville-Bailleul, France

Château de Filières

In 1467 Jehan de Fillières bought the current Château de Filières estate and built a new building to the site of castle destroyed in Hundred Years" War. This was burnt down in 1591 during the Wars of Religion. The next castle was built in Henry IV style around 1599. Louise-Catherine Chardon de Filières rebuilt the castle again in 1767-1768.
Founded: 1599-1768 | Location: Gommerville, France

Château du Vaudroc

Château du Vaudroc was built to the site of Benedictine Priory from 1746. The park is open to the public couple of times annually.
Founded: 1746 | Location: Limpiville, France

Manoir du Clap

Manoir du Clap is an od mansion located in the village of 'La cerlangue', in Normandy. It was built in the late 1590"s, during the reign of Henri IVth of France. In medieval times, the village was a part of Tancarville"s Baronny (which became a county under the domination of Jean II de Melun). At the end of the XVIth century, the place now called 'le Clap', not far from the village, became ec ...
Founded: 1590s | Location: La Cerlangue, France

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kirkjubøargarður

Kirkjubøargarður ('Yard of Kirkjubøur', also known as King"s Farm) is one of the oldest still inhabited wooden houses of the world. The farm itself has always been the largest in the Faroe Islands. The old farmhouse dates back to the 11th century. It was the episcopal residence and seminary of the Diocese of the Faroe Islands, from about 1100. Sverre I of Norway (1151–1202), grew up here and went to the priest school. The legend says, that the wood for the block houses came as driftwood from Norway and was accurately bundled and numbered, just for being set up. Note, that there is no forest in the Faroes and wood is a very valuable material. Many such wood legends are thus to be found in Faroese history.

The oldest part is a so-called roykstova (reek parlour, or smoke room). Perhaps it was moved one day, because it does not fit to its foundation. Another ancient room is the loftstovan (loft room). It is supposed that Bishop Erlendur wrote the 'Sheep Letter' here in 1298. This is the earliest document of the Faroes we know today. It is the statute concerning sheep breeding on the Faroes. Today the room is the farm"s library. The stórastovan (large room) is from a much later date, being built in 1772.

Though the farmhouse is a museum, the 17th generation of the Patursson Family, which has occupied it since 1550, is still living here. Shortly after the Reformation in the Faroe Islands in 1538, all the real estate of the Catholic Church was seized by the King of Denmark. This was about half of the land in the Faroes, and since then called King"s Land (kongsjørð). The largest piece of King"s Land was the farm in Kirkjubøur due to the above-mentioned Episcopal residence. This land is today owned by the Faroese government, and the Paturssons are tenants from generation to generation. It is always the oldest son, who becomes King"s Farmer, and in contrast to the privately owned land, the King"s Land is never divided between the sons.

The farm holds sheep, cattle and some horses. It is possible to get a coffee here and buy fresh mutton and beef directly from the farmer. In the winter season there is also hare hunting for the locals. Groups can rent the roykstovan for festivities and will be served original Faroese cuisine.

Other famous buildings directly by the farmhouse are the Magnus Cathedral and the Saint Olav"s Church, which also date back to the mediaeval period. All three together represent the Faroe Island"s most interesting historical site.