Chateaux of Normandy

Château du Bourg-Saint-Léonard

Château du Bourg-Saint-Léonard is a sumptuous building from the end of the 18th century, surrounded by stables, an orangery and a 400 ha park. The interior is decorated with beautiful furniture, Aubusson tapestries, woodwork from the 18th century and restored stairwell.
Founded: 18th century | Location: Le Bourg-Saint-Léonard, France

Château du Repas

The current Château du Repas was built to the site of older castle in the early 17th century, probably between 1605-1615. The U-shaped building was surrounded by a moat.
Founded: 1605-1615 | Location: Chênedouit, France

Château de Vimer

Château de Vimer was built in the early 1700s by Nollet de Malvoüe. It consists of main building and park built in 1840. During the Invasion of Normandy in 1944 the château was a field hospital.
Founded: 18th century | Location: Guerquesalles, France

Château du Buisson de May

In the Middle ages, the land of today Château du Buisson de May belonged probably to the family de May. The oldest written document dates back to XVth century, when Jean de Brucourt, responsible for the famous Chatelet of Paris, sold the estate of Osmoy Michel de Bordeaux. The family de Bordeaux kept the Buisson de May over the centuries, selling wood, letting out land, farm and houses, as they were aldermen in Vern ...
Founded: 1781-1783 | Location: Saint-Aquilin-de-Pacy, France

Château de Montaure

Château de Montaure was built in the early 1700s to the site of feudal castle from the 9th century. The current castle represents the Louis XV style. There are occasional events in the castle area.
Founded: 18th century | Location: Montaure, France

Château du Plessis-Bouquelon

Château du Plessis-Bouquelon was built first in the 16th century and enlarged during the 18th and 19th centuries. The oldest mention of the castle dates from 1464. The chapel was built in 1844.
Founded: 16th century | Location: Saint-Mards-de-Blacarville, France

Château de Saint-Gervais

The first record of Château de Saint-Gervais dates back to the year 1198. In 1651 Jean de Carrey, Advisor to the King in his finance chamber, acquires the titles of Lord of Saint Gervais. The destruction of the original chateau occured at the time of the Revolution (1794). In 1837 the land and property at Saint Gervais was acquired by Michel Pierre Alexis Hebert, barrister in the High Court subsequent Garde des Scea ...
Founded: 1840 | Location: Asnières, France

Château de Bailleul

Château de Bailleul was built by Bertrand de Bailleul, powerful nobleman, who acquired the land in 1534. The castle was probably completed between 1550-1560. It was strongly modified in the late 1700s and the major restoration was made in 1870-1890. It has never been sold and is still in possession of Bailleul family.
Founded: 1543-1560 | Location: Angerville-Bailleul, France

Château de Filières

In 1467 Jehan de Fillières bought the current Château de Filières estate and built a new building to the site of castle destroyed in Hundred Years" War. This was burnt down in 1591 during the Wars of Religion. The next castle was built in Henry IV style around 1599. Louise-Catherine Chardon de Filières rebuilt the castle again in 1767-1768.
Founded: 1599-1768 | Location: Gommerville, France

Château du Vaudroc

Château du Vaudroc was built to the site of Benedictine Priory from 1746. The park is open to the public couple of times annually.
Founded: 1746 | Location: Limpiville, France

Manoir du Clap

Manoir du Clap is an od mansion located in the village of 'La cerlangue', in Normandy. It was built in the late 1590"s, during the reign of Henri IVth of France. In medieval times, the village was a part of Tancarville"s Baronny (which became a county under the domination of Jean II de Melun). At the end of the XVIth century, the place now called 'le Clap', not far from the village, became ec ...
Founded: 1590s | Location: La Cerlangue, France

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kromeriz Castle and Gardens

Kroměříž stands on the site of an earlier ford across the River Morava. The gardens and castle of Kroměříž are an exceptionally complete and well-preserved example of a European Baroque princely residence and its gardens and described as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The first residence on the site was founded by bishop Stanislas Thurzo in 1497. The building was in a Late Gothic style, with a modicum of Renaissance detail. During the Thirty Years' War, the castle was sacked by the Swedish army (1643).

It was not until 1664 that a bishop from the powerful Liechtenstein family charged architect Filiberto Lucchese with renovating the palace in a Baroque style. The chief monument of Lucchese's work in Kroměříž is the Pleasure Garden in front of the castle. Upon Lucchese's death in 1666, Giovanni Pietro Tencalla completed his work on the formal garden and had the palace rebuilt in a style reminiscent of the Turinese school to which he belonged.

After the castle was gutted by a major fire in March 1752, Bishop Hamilton commissioned two leading imperial artists, Franz Anton Maulbertsch and Josef Stern, arrived at the residence in order to decorate the halls of the palace with their works. In addition to their paintings, the palace still houses an art collection, generally considered the second finest in the country, which includes Titian's last mythological painting, The Flaying of Marsyas. The largest part of the collection was acquired by Bishop Karel in Cologne in 1673. The palace also contains an outstanding musical archive and a library of 33,000 volumes.

UNESCO lists the palace and garden among the World Heritage Sites. As the nomination dossier explains, 'the castle is a good but not outstanding example of a type of aristocratic or princely residence that has survived widely in Europe. The Pleasure Garden, by contrast, is a very rare and largely intact example of a Baroque garden'. Apart from the formal parterres there is also a less formal nineteenth-century English garden, which sustained damage during floods in 1997.

Interiors of the palace were extensively used by Miloš Forman as a stand-in for Vienna's Hofburg Imperial Palace during filming of Amadeus (1984), based on the life of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who actually never visited Kroměříž. The main audience chamber was also used in the film Immortal Beloved (1994), in the piano concerto scene.