Religious sites in Italy

Abbey of Sant'Albino

The Abbey of Sant"Albino is a church-monastery complex, founded in the 5th century in Mortara.  In 774 the abbot Alkwin Albin added a canonical college to the church, which had become a stopping place for pilgrims traveling south to Rome. The church of Sant"Eusebio had putatively been founded by Charlemagne to bury the soldiers of his army who died locally in a battle on October 12, 773. Among the casualties t ...
Founded: 5th century AD | Location: Mortara, Italy

Santa Maria in Binda

Santa Maria in Binda is an ancient and small church, built in Romanesque-style church in Nosate. This church was built here in the 8th century during the Lombard rule of the area; the word Binda in the Lombard language meant a stretch of land, meant to be a stretch of land near the river. Originally and even till the 18th-century, this church served in funeral rites for nearby burials. The interior was frescoed in ...
Founded: 8th century AD | Location: Nosate, Italy

San Lanfranco Church

San Lanfranco is a Romanesque-style Roman Catholic church and former abbey. A paleochristian church at the site, dedicated to the Holy Sepulcher (Santo Sepolcro) was located near here, and the first documentation of a monastery here date to 1090. The monastery became associated with the Vallumbrosan Order, and hosted the bishop Lanfranco Beccaria, till his death in 1198. Pope Alexander III elevated Lanfranco to saint ...
Founded: 11th century | Location: Pavia, Italy

Basilica di Santa Giulia

The Basilica di Santa Giulia is a medieval former church in Bonate Sotto. Built in the early 12th century, only its apse area remain today in a short plain outside the town. According to local tradition, it would have been founded by St. Julia of Corsica herself, or by the Lombard queen Theodelinda. It is mentioned in a letter from 1129 by Pope Honorius II. An abbey had its centre here, being abandoned together with the ...
Founded: c. 1129 | Location: Bonate Sotto, Italy

Santa Maria della Valle Church

The church of Santa Maria della Valle, also called Santa Maria della Scala, is known under the name of Badiazza, and was probably built during the 11th century in the Badiazza dried up riverbed of a stream that gives its name to the church. The church, that lies at the feet of the San Rizzo mountains, was recently restored and given back to the citizens and tourists who love to discover historic beauties not too far from ...
Founded: 11th century | Location: Messina, Italy

San Martino Church

The Church of San Martino is located in the chief town of Arnad-Le-Vieux. The current building has a trapezoidal layout, with three naves that preserve a roof made of Gothic, low pointed cross vaults. The pillars support large arches that rest on capitals. The facade has a central tuff portal from the 15th century, decorated with a keel-shaped arch, representing two intertwined tree trunks with an overhead rose window. Th ...
Founded: 15th century | Location: Arnad, Italy

Santa Croce Church

The original church at the site of Santa Croce was founded in 1080, outside the walls of the village under the patronage of Pope Gregory VII. With the expansion of the town, the church was rebuilt in 1596 using designs of Pellegrino Tibaldi. One of the holy relics of the church is putatively a foot print of Christ, though made of Carrara marble, and, according to the tradition, dating back to the period of the Crusades. ...
Founded: 1596 | Location: Mortara, Italy

Church of Santa Maria della Vittoria

Santa Maria della Vittoria, simply called the 'Mother Church', is the most important religious building in the city of San Vito dei Normanni. The largest church in the city shows evidence of previous wars from the fist-sized holes that can be seen in and around the exterior. Built in the shape of a Latin cross with three naves, a transept and a deep chancel. Inside valuable paintings such as the icon of Nicopeia ...
Founded: 1571 | Location: San Vito dei Normanni, Italy

Basilica of Santa Maria a Pugliano

The Basilica of Santa Maria a Pugliano is the main church in Ercolano and the oldest church in the area around Mount Vesuvius. The church contains two pagan marble sarcophagi from the 2nd and 4th centuries AD, later adapted into Christian altars, probably in the 11th century. There are records of an oratory dedicated to the Virgin Mary in the 11th century on a hill called Pugliano. During the following centuries the ...
Founded: 11th century | Location: Ercolano, Italy

San Leone Church

San Leone is a 12th-century Byzantine church located in Saracena. Built in the Greek Cross layout typical of churches of Byzantine cult (11th century), the church, originally dedicated to St Catherine of Alexandria, was reconsecrated to St Leo in the 13th century by bishop Guglielmo di Bisignano. The layout has elements of both Romanesque and early Gothic architecture. For example, the bell-tower has mullioned windo ...
Founded: 11th century | Location: Saracena, Italy

Sanctuary of Santa Cristina

The Sanctuary of Santa Cristina is a stone chapel or small church perched precariously atop a rocky crag, some 1300 meters high, overlooking the Val Grande National Park. It is within the territory of the comune of Cantoira in the Metropolitan City of Turin, Piedmont, northern Italy. The church is only accessible via an arduous trek up hundreds of hewn stairs. The site had a votive pillar erected in 1440 and dedicated to ...
Founded: 1440 | Location: Cantoira, Italy

Tempietto di San Fedelino

The Tempietto di San Fedelino is a 10th to 11th-century small, Roman Catholic sanctuary or church, located in a remote rural site at the south shore of the River Mera. The small church is made of local stone and has a rounded apse. It still retains some 11th-century frescoes. The frescoes resemble those from the apse of the church of San Vincenzo in Galliano (circa 1004–1007).
Founded: 10th century AD | Location: Novate Mezzola, Italy

Cerreto Abbey

The Abbazia del Cerreto is a former Cistercian monastery in the town of Abbadia Cerreto. The town is named after the abbey. The building now functions as a parish church. The original monastery, with surrounding territory, was founded by the Benedictine order, but in 1139, the monks at the institution identifed themselves as Cistercians. By 1500, the monastery had been reduced to a few members, and the abbey church was c ...
Founded: 1139 | Location: Abbadia Cerreto, Italy

San Filippo di Fragalà Monastery

The Monastery of San Filippo Fragala, located in the small town of Frazzanò, is one of the oldest basilian monasteries in Sicily. Approximately 2km from the town centre, the monastery was built from the Count Ruggero and his wife Adelasia in 1090 and was an important centre for religious studies on saints. In 1866 the rich library of the monastery was transferred into the town to create an easier access to the books but ...
Founded: 1090 | Location: Frazzanò, Italy

Accola Abbey

Accola Abbey was mentioned first time in 881 AD in a letter of Charlemagne. The altar dates from 1482 and frescoes from the 18th century.
Founded: 881 AD | Location: Borghetto di Vara, Italy

Santa Maria Church

The Romanesque Santa Maria (St. Mary"s) church, which is located at the foot of the medieval castle, was the seat of the parish until the end of the 18th century. The bell tower is a typical square shaped tower. During the digs carried out in the building, the remains of the ancient early-Christian church and the relative baptismal font were found. The semi-circular shaped crypt, near the choir, dates back to the 11t ...
Founded: 11th century | Location: Villeneuve, Italy

Santa Maria di Corazzo Abbey

The Abbazia di Santa Maria di Corazzo was founded in the 11th century in a valley near the Corace River, today, within the town of Carlopoli. Originally a Benedictine monastery, the Corazzo Abbey was reconstructed by the Cistercians in the 12th century, and shortly thereafter would be where Gioacchino da Fiore became a monk and then, an abbot. There, he began writing La Genealogia (The Genealogy), his first of many ...
Founded: 11th century | Location: Carlopoli, Italy

Capuchin Church

Construction of the Chiesa dei Cappuccini or Church of the Capuchin Monks began in the 12th century and was only completed by the early 14th century. The façade with a local stone base, and brick superior zone has a portal with multiple columns and a fresco in the lunette from the 17th century. In 1623 the Cappuccini (a Franciscan order) were assigned to this church. They erected an adjacent convent, and remained here un ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Varzi, Italy

San Giovanni Theristis Abbey

Calabria was part of the Byzantine Empire until the 11th century. A Greek monk, St. John Theristus, operated in the Stilaro Valley during the 9th century. His aghiasma ('holy font') became a popular center of local pilgrimage, and here a Byzantine monastery was founded in the 11th century. After the Norman conquest of southern Italy, it developed as one of the most important Basilian monasteries in souther ...
Founded: 11th century | Location: Bivongi, Italy

Nostra Segnora de Mesumundu

Nostra Segnora de Mesumundu is located in the archaeological complex with the same name. It was built in the 6th century, during the Byzantine domination of the island, over a pre-existing Roman structure (2nd century AD). The Byzantines re-used part of the walls of the Roman building, as well as the aqueduct. The edifice could have been used as a baptistery. However, it is also possible that it was used for the purificat ...
Founded: 6th century AD | Location: Siligo, Italy

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.