Santa Maria in Araceli

Vicenza, Italy

The church of Santa Maria in Araceli is a late-Baroque style church built in the late 17th century in Vicenza according to designs attributed to Guarino Guarini. Construction of the present church was begun during 1672-1680, a period during which the famous architect Guarino Guarini resided in Vicenza under the patronage of the Theatines. In 1965, designs for the church were found in the Vatican Library. Construction seems to have been guided by Carlo Borella. It was about 60 years after the start of construction, on November 17, 1743, that the church was consecrated. In 1810, during the Napoleonic occupation, the convent was expropriated, and the church became a parish church.

The main baroque altar (1696), was carved in marble by Tommaso Bezzi . It contains an altarpiece representing the Tiburtine Sybil who portends the coming Virgin and Child to the Roman Emperor Augustus attributed to Pietro Liberi . The altar on the right has a 13th-century painted crucifix, originally from church of San Vito.

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Details

Founded: 1672
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

cristiano marzola (5 months ago)
Da visitare ... Stupenda e unica nel stile .consiglio con guida da effettuare il camminamento sopra le volte
Francesco Carta (5 months ago)
One among Vicenza's most beautiful,iconic and representative churches,albeit not the most ancient. Too bad they have very limited opening hours.
austine ogom (6 months ago)
Good
Gheorghe Hutupas (7 months ago)
Ok
DAVID SNYDER (15 months ago)
Beautiful.
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