Santa Maria dei Miracoli

Brescia, Italy

Following a plague that afflicted Brescia between 1480 and 1484, there were rumours that a votive fresco depicting the Madonna and Child in front of a house in the San Nazario quarter had developed miraculous powers. On the wave of popular religious fervour, the Catholic church began negotiations in 1486 for the purchase of the house. In 1488, the construction of the Santa Maria dei Miracoli began.

The interior, but not the façade, of the church was severely damaged by bombardment during the Second World War. The exterior was protected by wooden scaffolding. The interior has been subsequently restored.

Architecture

The church plan with its cylindrical anterior dome was designed by Ludovico Beretta before 1490. The most striking element is the elaborately decorated marble reliefs in the façade screen and portico designed by Giovanni Antonio Amadeo, and completed with the help of a large number of sculptors, including the recently arrived Sanmicheli. The sculpted profusion recalls the Renaissance exterior of the Charterhouse of Pavia.

The porch, added later, is divided into four columns by straight grooves which rest all on one high base and supporting a rectangular tribune, in a turn topped by a narrow kiosk with triangular pediment. The interior is a square divided into three naves by pillars and columns, with a pentagonal apse.

Art

The work of the Sanmicheli corresponding to the base level was the most refined of the façade, and was accomplished by the year 1500. Meanwhile, the religious building underwent rapid development, thanks to the growing number of worshippers and their alms, and was expanded to its current size. The architectural scores in the interior, characterized by decorative characters are attributed to Gasparo Cairano and his studio. The same sculptor also executed the cycle of the Apostles for the first dome, interspersed with the cycle of Angels by Tamagnino, all of which were delivered and paid for in 1489.

Over the centuries, the sanctuary was enriched by artistic works, mainly paintings, including a compelling canvas of St Nicholas of Bari presenting two children to the Virgin (1539) by Moretto, which is now in the Pinacoteca Tosio Martinengo. Grazio Cossali's frescoes on the Baptism of Christ and Adoration by the Shepherds are still in the church. The cycle of canvases of the Life of Jesus, painted by a number of artists including Tommaso Bona and Piermaria Bagnadore, is found in the presbytery.

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Details

Founded: 1488
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

anto pax (16 months ago)
wow!
DAVID SNYDER (2 years ago)
The ornately carved portico on the main facde (1500) is a fitting prelude to the beautiful and unique interior that suffered great damage during the allied bombardments in WWII.
Oleg Naumov (3 years ago)
Excellent monument of medieval culture and architecture. After WW II Winston Churchill said that it was the most beautiful building he ever saw. It really beautiful outside and inside. Visitors are allowed to take non commercial photo without flash light.
Dimitris Rallis (3 years ago)
..here we pray for Her help in following in our last steps in this life to be able to follow our Christian life us our Freres guide us in our early life..
Francis Darlington (3 years ago)
A great olden age church built some thousand years ago. Worth visiting
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