St. Catherine's Church

Zagreb, Croatia

Before the St. Catherine's was built, a 14th-century Dominican church occupied the area. When the Jesuits arrived in Zagreb in the early 17th century, they thought the original church too rundown and inadequate, and worked to build a new church. Construction began in 1620 and was completed in 1632. A monastery was built adjacent to the church, but now the spot is home to the Klovićevi dvori art gallery.

St. Catherine's church was victim to fire twice in history: once in 1645 and again in 1674, devastating the interior. The church was refurnished with help from wealthy Croatian nobles, and in return, they were allowed to display their family coat-of-arms or have the honour to be buried or entombed in the church.

After the disestablishment of the Jesuits, St. Catherine's became part of the parish of St. Mark's in 1793. Since 1874, St. Catherine's has been a Collegiate church.

The church was severely damaged by the 1880 earthquake. After 6 months of repairs, it was reconsecrated in November 1881.

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Details

Founded: 1620-1632
Category: Religious sites in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anna (3 months ago)
I couldn't enter the church but it looks great and preserved well. There's a spot for the view behind this church, so check it out.
Владислав Цанков (15 months ago)
Before the St. Catherine's was built, a 14th-century Dominican church occupied the area. When the Jesuits arrived in Zagreb in the early 17th century, they thought the original church too rundown and inadequate, and worked to build a new church. Construction began in 1620 and was completed in 1632. A monastery was built adjacent to the church, but now the spot is home to the Klovićevi dvori art gallery.
Anamarija Bezjak (22 months ago)
Very beautiful old church. Ornaments on the walls and ceilings are amazing. You can feel spirituality and certain calmness.
Toma Klusaitė (2 years ago)
Haven't been inside of the church but there is a wonderful panorama behind it
Željko Peruško (2 years ago)
Good place for concerts
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