St. Catherine's Church

Zagreb, Croatia

Before the St. Catherine's was built, a 14th-century Dominican church occupied the area. When the Jesuits arrived in Zagreb in the early 17th century, they thought the original church too rundown and inadequate, and worked to build a new church. Construction began in 1620 and was completed in 1632. A monastery was built adjacent to the church, but now the spot is home to the Klovićevi dvori art gallery.

St. Catherine's church was victim to fire twice in history: once in 1645 and again in 1674, devastating the interior. The church was refurnished with help from wealthy Croatian nobles, and in return, they were allowed to display their family coat-of-arms or have the honour to be buried or entombed in the church.

After the disestablishment of the Jesuits, St. Catherine's became part of the parish of St. Mark's in 1793. Since 1874, St. Catherine's has been a Collegiate church.

The church was severely damaged by the 1880 earthquake. After 6 months of repairs, it was reconsecrated in November 1881.

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Details

Founded: 1620-1632
Category: Religious sites in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Viorel Iosub (2 months ago)
The church facade is simple. The church is open for Mass only on Sunday.
Goran Krsticevic (2 months ago)
Baroque church of St Catherine Built by Jesuits in the 17th century
Karlo Šunjo (3 months ago)
Beautiful acoustics and stuccos on inner walls
Mirosław Kuczyński (4 months ago)
Amazing church, continuously eroded by nature and grown again.
Prizmic Franko (4 months ago)
That peacefulness you cannot describe, you just have to feel it!
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