Lotrscak Tower

Zagreb, Croatia

The Lotrščak Tower is located in an old part of town called Gradec of Zagreb. The tower, which dates to the 13th century, was built to guard the southern gate of the Gradec town wall. The name is derived from Latin campana latrunculorum, meaning 'thieves' bell', referring to a bell hung in the tower in 1646 to signal the closing of the town gates.

The Grič cannon is one of the Zagreb landmarks. In the 19th century, a fourth floor and windows were added to the tower and a cannon was placed on the top. Since 1 January 1877, the cannon is fired from the tower on Grič to mark midday. The cannon was to give the sign for exact noon for the bell-ringers of the city's churches.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gerhard Klimeck (14 months ago)
Wanderi g through old town. Fun even for kids ages 12 and 14
Keith Allen (14 months ago)
Good views of the city from the top viewing platform. It costs 20kuna Peterson, but well worth the walk up the spiral stairs. Stop on the gun landing and read about the gun that is fired every day at midday.
Viorel Iosub (15 months ago)
The perfect spot to enjoy a nice view over the town. Ensure you're there at noon so you can see the cannon shooting.
Vatroslav Mlinar (16 months ago)
Old tower with shooting cannon symbolizing the noon everyday from January 1. 1877
Harald Simons (16 months ago)
nice sieht with friends staff for accessing the roof top with good overview also excellent cafe nearby
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