Zagreb Cathedral

Zagreb, Croatia

The Zagreb Cathedral is the tallest building in Croatia. It is dedicated to the Assumption of Mary and to kings Saint Stephen and Saint Ladislaus. The cathedral is typically Gothic, as is its sacristy, which is of great architectural value. Its prominent spires are considered to be landmarks as they are visible from most parts of the city.

In 1093 when King Ladislaus (1040-1095) moved the bishop's chair from Sisak to Zagreb, he proclaimed the existing church as a cathedral. Construction on the cathedral started shortly after his death and was finished in 1217 and consecrated by king Andrew II of Hungary. The building was destroyed by the Mongols in 1242 but rebuilt by bishop Timotej (1263-1287) a few years later. At the end of the 15th century, the Ottoman Empire invaded Croatia, triggering the construction of fortification walls around the cathedral, some of which are still intact. In the 17th century, a fortified renaissance watchtower was erected on the south side, and was used as a military observation point, because of the Ottoman threat.

The cathedral was severely damaged in the 1880 Zagreb earthquake. The main nave collapsed and the tower was damaged beyond repair. The restoration of the cathedral in the Neo-Gothic style was led by Hermann Bollé, bringing the cathedral to its present form. As part of that restoration, two spires 108 m high were raised on the western side, both of which are now in the process of being restored as part of an extensive general restoration of the cathedral.

When facing the portal, the building is 46 meters wide and 108 meters high. The cathedral contains a relief of Cardinal Aloysius Stepinac with Christ done by the Croatian sculptor Ivan Meštrović. The cathedral was visited by Pope Benedict XVI on 5 June 2011 where he celebrated Sunday Vespers and prayed before the tomb of Blessed Aloysius Stepinac.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Julian Wong (2 years ago)
One of the biggest church in the old town of Zagreb, it is majestic and grand with a big square in front. It is a working church so do exercise respect when visiting the inside. Definitely must make a stopover if you are in the vicinity. The right tower is currently under renovation but they take the trouble to cover it nicely.
Gerhard Klimeck (2 years ago)
Impressive dome worthwhile seeing. Wandered down from old town and back up. Fun visit despite the heat
Pete Ashmore (2 years ago)
I didn't go inside, but I loved the vibrant market in the square, so colorfull and full I life. Look for the twin spires if you get lost, a great aid to navigating the maze of narrow streets!
Vito Balen (2 years ago)
The Cathedral of Zagreb is one the most famous buildings in the city. It is magnificent, but it's a shame that it's being restored for I don't know how many years now
Dragan Simonovski (2 years ago)
A magical place, full of positive energy. It's in the very centre of the city, so it is easy to come by it. If you are already there, a visit to the flower market near by is obligatory, or is a legendary place.
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