Veliki Tabor Castle

Hum Košnički, Croatia

Veliki Tabor is a castle and museum in northwest Croatia, dating from the middle of 15th century. The castle's present appearance dates back to the 16th century. Most of the castle was built by the Hungarian noble family of Ráttkay, in whose ownership it remained until 1793.

The oldest part of the fort centre is its central part, the pentagonal castle, whose stylistic characteristics belong to the Late Gothic period. The castle is surrounded by four semi-circular Renaissance towers connected by curtain walls and the walls of the northern entrance part. The fort centre is surrounded by the outer defence wall (the distance from the easternmost to the westernmost points being about 225 metres) with a farm office, a Renaissance bastion, two semi-circular guardhouses (northern and southern), and the quadrangular entrance tower (present only on the archaeological level) through which the access road ran.

In the Middle Ages, Veliki Tabor belonged to Hermann II, Count of Celje. His son Fridrik fell in love with Veronika, a girl from a poor family. Hermann refused to accept a minor noblewoman as his daughter-in-law. He accused her of witchcraft and had her drowned. Frederick's rebellion against Hermann ended with Frederick's imprisonment. Her body was walled up in Veliki Tabor. Veronika’s weeping can still be heard from the castle, according to some stories.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Elvis Ferhatovic (2 years ago)
Very nice old castle situated near Kumrovec. It has a lot of history. We visited one morning on a snowy day and the view was beautiful. It is not very big and you can check everything in about two hours. Recommendations for everyone to visit.
Tomislava Sabo Pavunić (3 years ago)
Nice castle,polite staff
Tomislava Sabo Pavunić (3 years ago)
Nice castle,polite staff
Josip M. (3 years ago)
Beautiful restored medieval castle.
Josip Mikuš (3 years ago)
Beautiful restored medieval castle.
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