Once the largest city-fortress in the entire Republic of Venice, Zadar’s walls allowed it to retain more of its independence than most of its neighbouring cities, and meant that it was never captured by the Turks.

The most impressive gate of the walls was Land Gate - then the main entrance into the city - in the little Foša harbour, built by a Venetian architect Michele Sanmicheli in 1543. It is considered one of the finest monuments of the Renaissance in Dalmatia, and has the form of a triumphal arch with a central passage for wheeled traffic, and two smaller side arches for pedestrians. It is decorated with motifs such as St. Chrysogonus (Zadar’s main patron saint) on his horse, and the Shield of St. Mark (the coat of arms of the Republic of Venice). Previously, the area had been highly defensive, with a surrounding moat.

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Address

Trg pet bunara 1, Zadar, Croatia
See all sites in Zadar

Details

Founded: 1543
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

More Information

www.zadar.travel

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Teodora Mihaela Tarcza (2 years ago)
It is a very beautiful gate that enters the Old City of Zadar. It is close to a great pine park .
Franjo Creado (2 years ago)
Place to shoot ur photo skills beautiful
Joerg Hehl (2 years ago)
Walking through the Land Gate with a great view to the old town is really special
G (2 years ago)
Have a walk and past it by. Cool to imagine what it must have been like hundreds of years ago.
Gert Liekens (2 years ago)
Great gate, amazing gate, very spectacular. You feel like you are entering the city
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